Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]

; re came to live in that most uncomfortable

a perpetual bustle, and all our meals were a sin ei domestic turmoils. Aunt Prissie constantly 2:51 dinner in her bonnet, and as for sitting still 3 hai or any other time, it was a thing she never - She always arranged household matters breakfast

, affirming that she could not find any Cote in which to do it; so that she devoured her

latter, and drank her tea between her various
2 kitchen and store-room. Certainly she might
ai mant of time, for in addition to her attendance
Perbe, and the care of our house, she had not
ceciler patients to attend to, but she had under-
ha de oversight of Dr. Ford's establishment ; for, as
- How can he ever get on without some one to
war things

, when he is so gouty he can only just
tres bis study? No mortal hands or legs could
ugh the work and the labour she had cut out for
sefde sure that something must be left undone, and
appeared, that the thing which would be given up
z jealous sedulous watchfulness of Aunt Phoebe. I
-- and rejoiced to see it; and did not despair, if I could
pade my dear aunt to exert herself, of freeing her,
es some measure, from the servitude in which she
lag lived. Such a complete emancipation as was

for her, I dared not anticipate. There was a - regular irregularity in Aunt Prissie's proceedings ; Fat out after breakfast; rushed back to give Aunt

ber dianer; then out again, and returned no more At was our dinner-time, generally, indeed, not until

- later.

dent Phæbe, in spite of the unhealthy life she led, was

maly stronger, and less wan and thin than she had

mat: and that she felt herself so, was evident from the ally we came to live in that most uncomfortable , a perpetual bustle, and all our meals were a n of domestic turmoils. Aunt Prissie constantly wn dinner in her bonnet, and as for sitting still hat or any other time, it was a thing she never

imation she showed to more about, and the desire she

reased

10 go to church. To me she talked about it

of. She always arranged household matters t breakfast, affirming that she could not find any inute in which to do it ; so that she devoured her nd butter, and drank her tea between her various the kitchen and store-room. Certainly she might ad want of time, for in addition to her attendance at Phoebe, and the care of our house, she had not er other patients to attend to, but she had underthe oversight of Dr. Ford's establishment; for, as d, “How can he ever get on without some one to _fter things, when he is so gouty he can only just

across his study?' No mortal hands or legs could rough the work and the labour she bad cut out for one felt sure that something must be left undone, and n appeared, that the thing which would be given up er jealous sedulous watchfulness of Aunt Phæbe. I , and rejoiced to see it; and did not despair, if I could ersuade

my

dear aunt to exert herself, of freeing her, est in some measure, from the servitude in wbich she so long lived. Such a complete emancipation as was ore for her, I dared not anticipate. There was a of regular irregularity in Aunt Prissie's proceedings; vent out after breakfast; rushed back to give Aunt be her dinner; then out again, and returned no more I it wis our dinner-time, generally, indeed, not until Tu later. unt Phæbe, in spite of the unhealthy life she led, was ainly stronger, and less wan and thin than she had

; and that she felt herself so, was evident from the ination she showed to move about, and the desire she ressed to go to church. To me she talked about it

[graphic]

, that a wet afternoon made her quite unhappy. ta delightful to see her enjoyment in the birds and And all the loveliness of summer from which she en so long separated. She seemed to drink the ser and expand in the sunshine like some halfF* sekly plant

. She would sit or walk about in a ps to deep for many words, and every now and e pate a sigh of exquisite happiness, and say at last, - Fatie

, it is like being in Heaven ! It was wonderwa she seemed to improve in health and strength ; peris brightened, and her cheeks grew pink with a *: a lovely and delicate as ever tinted them in youth,

anabing of their natural coral returned to the lips
-as had been white so long. My father and I agreed
ja de looked twenty years younger ; even Aunt Prissie
u sreck with the change, and exclaimed one day, after
zaplating her with great satisfaction, 'Upon my
** Pbæbe

, I think that new decoction we have been
is doing wonders ; I do believe I have hit on the
thing at last. Don't you feel better?
is, indeed I do,' Aunt Phæbe replied. So much

I am thinking of going to church next Sunday.
Sast Sunday! Aunt Prissie exclaimed;' perhaps you

o next summer if you continue improving, but I
is not have you playing tricks with yourself, I can tell

Howerer I shall have a fine triumph over Dr.
is who often talks to me about you, and laughed
sarily when I told him what I was giving you. Ah,

3 be will be convinced now that I know rather more

It did not seem the moment to inform her of the real ze of the change, just when she was pluming herself w the virtue of her new decoction; so we let it pass, that e might enjoy her triumph over Dr. Ford. As Aunt Prebe said, ' it would be time enough to tell her when

an be thinks I do.

Sunday really came.

[ocr errors]

s, that a wet afternoon made her quite unhappy. lelightful to see her enjoyment in the birds and

and all the loveliness of summer from which she en so long separated. She seemed to drink the ir and expand in the sunshine like some halfsickly plant. She would sit or walk about in a too deep for many words, and every now and eathe a sigh of exquisite bappiness, and say at last, lattie, it is like being in Heaven ! It was wonderw she seemed to improve in health and strength; s brightened, and her cheeks grew pink with a as lovely and delicate as ever tinted them in youth, mething of their natural coral returned to the lips had been white so long. My father and I agreed le looked twenty years younger ; even Aunt Prissie ruck with the change, and exclaimed one day, after oplating her with great satisfaction, 'Upon my Phæbe, I think that new decoction we have been

is doing wonders ; I do believe I have hit on the
thing at last. Don't you feel better?'
es, indeed I do,' Aunt Phoebe replied. “So much
at I am thinking of going to church next Sunday.'
ext Sunday !' Aunt Prissie exclaimed; ' perhaps you
go next summer if you continue improving, but I
not have you playing tricks with yourself, I can tell

However I shall have a fine triumph or Dr.
, who often talks to me about you, and laughed
ily when I told him what I was giving you. Ah,
! he will be convinced now that I know rather more
he thinks I do.'
did not seem the moment to inform her of the real
e of the change, just when she was ploming herself
he virtue of her new decoction; so we let it pass, that
might enjoy her triumph over Dr. Ford. As Aunt
zbe said, “it would be time enough to tell her when
day really came.'

[graphic]

z. 'Ob! I am sure I am very glad you are so strong ;
al net say you might as well have told me how much
el we doing than was needful, and not let me go on
se ud saving and waiting upon you, when you were
- 2 vne as capable of waiting on yourself as I am.'
ha a shame in me,' Aunt Phæbe meekly answered.
x dier Prissie, your long kind care is come to an end.
4 ez dine with you all to-day, and come down to break-
* S-borrow, and don't take any more trouble about
y lan really going to church on Sunday. You know

- a strong enough to go out, it would not be right in
at refrain from going there.

1x: Prissie did not say much in reply; she was very and snappish, but still she did not seem as much put - a we bad expected; and as for the going to church, e zly replied, 'If

you will

go, you must ; but do not sweat me to sanction such folly.

rhan Sunday came she disappeared after dinner, Sixt even one injunction to Aunt Phæbe to wrap sul properly up. I was very glad, for I wanted to keep y dear aunt as quiet as possible

, and not to have anyone
ering about her

, and making her more nervous and ex-
54 than she was already. Indeed, when it came to the
sist, she was trembling so much, that, but for my father's
M I doubt if she would have been able to get there;
ai rhen at last she was safely ensconced in the pew, and
sveld look at her, I could see the throb of her heart
saragh her shawl, and the heat drops standing on her
be, and began to fear that the effort was, in truth, be-
ped her strength

. But the tears which rolled over her
Szebed cheeks seemed to relieve her, and gradually she
talned down, and her face resumed its usual peaceful
maquil expression, and the quivering mouth settled into
1 Serene smile of thankfulness, which reminded me of the
Wheann sweetness of that smile wliich I had once seen on
* dead mother's lips. We had gone early that she

38

PART 84.

VOL, 14.

« PreviousContinue »