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te now, I never meant you to be there. You ought one to bed, child. It is not a thing for you to nything about,' ly want to know whether it was the Osbornes who ut these stories,' said Sophy, with a firm resolute

dear,' exclaimed Albinia, what can it signify ? re only excessively ridiculous and a very good joke. not think there had been so much imagination in d.' And off she went laughing again. ey are very wicked,' said Sophy; 'Aunt Maria, I low if it was Mrs. Osborne who told the story.' hy's will was too potent for Miss Meadows, and the ion was extracted from her in a burst of other odds nds, in the midst of which Albinia beheld Sophy he room with a deliberate, determined step. Flying her, she found her in the hall, wrapping herself in a e. phy, what is this? What are you about? et me alone,” said Sophy, straining against her ing hand, 'I do not know when I shall go out - and I will go at once and tell the Osbornes that I done with them. I stuck to them because I thought were my mother's friends; I did not guess that they I make an unworthy use of my friendship, and invent ed stories of my father and you.' lease don't make me laugh, Sophy, for I don't want Front you. Yes, it is generous feeling; I don't wonder are angry; but indeed silly nonsense like this is not h it. It will die away of itself; it must be dead dy, now they have seen we have not run away to ada. Your heroics only make it more ridiculous.'

must tell Loo never to come here with her hypocrisy,' ated Sophy, standing still, but not yielding an inch. Liss Meadows pursued them at the same moment with ken protestations that they must forget it, she never

lesz vilich Sophy only thought insulting, and almost mi d besity. Then came a representation of expeväed sbe scorned; and next

, going a step higher, Es land recourse to the duty of forgiveness

, but found was ihn for Sophy thought she had personally nothing

te Obedience to her father shook her purpose 13 and at last it was finally demolished by Albinia ki, "Bat really, I don't know with what face you cad Louisa

, when you helped her to persecute
Prezrière because you thought she had an instru-
camture in her drawer.
te st I who said that,' said Sophy, blushing.

part with those who did.
pre neste mas a much more defenceless victim than

: myself?
impedid not do it now,

' said Sophy.
sade no more efforts, and Albinia had time to say,
sed not take much individual blackness of heart to
ap a fine promising slander. A surmise made in
3 mpeated in earnest, and all the other tale-bearers
wsy are telling simple facts. Depend upon it, the
jaid not set off from the Osbornes by any means as it

And poor

sa bags to Aunt Maria.

broald like to know.

e't let us make it any worse ; and above all, do not

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2.? said Sophy, emphatically.

- Albinia's surprise no inuendo from Mrs. or Miss

a ti ever referred to her management having caused

misfortune ; and she secretly attributed this silence kr. Kendal's escorting his sister-in-law to her own

(To be continued.)

And poor

, which Sophy only thought insulting, and almost of levity. Then came a representation of expewhich she scorned; and next, going a step higher, had recourse to the duty of forgiveness, but found ed, for Sophy thought she had personally nothing e. Obedience to her father shook her purpose and at last it was finally demolished by Albinia ' But really, I don't know with what face you Etack Louisa, when you helped her to persecute neviève because you thought she had an instrutorture in her drawer.' as not I who said that,' said Sophy, blushing. · took part with those who did. ere was a much more defenceless victim than = myself.' ould not do it now,' said Sophy. made no more efforts, and Albinia had time to say, es not take much individual blackness of heart to ap a fine promising slander. A surmise made in repeated in earnest, and all the other tale-bearers they are telling simple facts. Depend upon it, the lid not set off from the Osbornes by any means as it back to Aunt Maria.' hould like to know.' on't let us make it any worse ; and above all, do not tell Lucy' no!' said Sophy, emphatically. Albinia's surprise no inuendo from Mrs. or Miss ows ever referred to her management having caused y's misfortune ; and she secretly attributed this silence r. Kendal's escorting his sister-in-law to her own

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wapens everal people ill of it in the village, and two ***

) persons died. I recollect also, that just about --- tiat Aunt Dorothea fell ill, poor old Dr. Ford - ote; and Aunt Prissie, who was very intimate

said that she was sure that if she had had asing of her, she could have saved her life. She

y the same age as Aunt Dorothea ; but still it a via settled point in the family, that her deatlı was

pering to mismanagement, that we none of us took es the similarity of symptoms and circumstances.

z fear of aggravating the fever, she prescribed for 1-3 rith Aunt Prissie's concurrence, a regimen of

e broth, and dry toast and tea, and took to her bed, u protesting it was a thing she never did for 80 La cause. A week of such a system reduced her ** a state of weakness, as at last alarmed my father, s insisted on sending to Upham for a doctor. He la is the evening, but it was too late to save her ; all os stimulants and tonics could do, was to make her sink

more slowly. She was sensible to the last, received ilds Communion, and spoke a few parting words,

- tored the burrble tranquil faith in which she died. Il me all with her, eren dear Aunt Phoebe was present,

sh and pale, and with so bright and steadfast a hope Tedy reunion in her heart, that as she threw her arms - Anat Prissie, who was by far the most agitated of ***a, she exclaimed, 'Oh! do not grieve so, it is only soch a little time, and then we shall all be together zin' And she talked to me afterwards quite cheerfully,

her tears were flowing, and said, what a “blessI she thought it that they three sisters had so long been Tro mills were found locked up in Aunt Dorothea's eta one dated at the time of my father's marriage, in phical there was no mention whatever of his name, and the whole of her property was bequeathed to her sisters ;

med to each other.

ere several people ill of it in the village, and two old persons died. I recollect also, that just about e that Aunt Dorothea fell ill, poor old Dr. Ford wife ; and Aunt Prissie, who was very intimate em, said that she was sure that if she had bad sing of her, she could have saved her life. She actly the same age as Aunt Dorothea ; but still it ch a settled point in the family, that her death was ? owing to mismanagement, that we none of us took at the similarity of symptoms and circumstances. he fear of aggravating the fever, she prescribed for , with Aunt Prissie's concurrence, a regimen of

broth, and dry toast and tea, and took to her bed, gh protesting it was a thing she never did for so a cause. A week of such a system reduced her h a state of weakness, as at last alarmed my father, e insisted on sending to Upham for a doctor. He in the evening, but it was too late to save her ; all is stimulants and tonics could do, was to make her sink e more slowly. She was sensible to the last, received Ioly Communion, and spoke a few parting words, 1 showed the humble tranquil faith in which she died. vere all with her, even dear Aunt Phoebe was present, Im and pale, and with so bright and steadfast a hope eedy reunion in her heart, that as she threw her arms d Aunt Prissie, who was by far the most agitated of two, she exclaimed, 'Oh! do not grieve so, it is only such a little time, and then we shall all be together n. And she talked to me afterwards quite cheerfully, gh her tears were flowing, and said, what a "blessshe thought it that they three sisters had so long been ed to each other.' wo wills were found locked up in Aunt Dorothea's 1, one dated at the time of my father's marriage, in .ch there was no mention whatever of his name, and whole of her property was bequeathed to her sisters ;

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