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tormenting too. I felt such a wish to stop and look at some of those pretty churches, and beautiful parks and woods. It is rather tiresome only to wait a minute or two at a bustling railway station, Don't you remember, “ Mammy dear," (you know I must say that sometimes,) that pretty little roadside inn at Belford, where we slept one night when we were going to Bath? I was a small dot of a thing, then; but, Mammy, don't think I shall ever forget the bowling-green and the arbour, which the maid called harbour, and the spreading elm, with the seat under it. Well, this does 'not tell you about my journey in this present summer of 1847, when your little Lucy is become a great big girl, " And little Lucy must be called no more."

• When Fanny and I got to the station, we found it was just as you told us it would be. Cousin IIenry was there with the gig waiting for us. He is so good-natured; he had brought all sorts of funny cloaks and hoods with him, in case it should rain. It was a treat to get into the open gig, and be able to look right and left and all about us, after being boxeil up in the railway carriage. We had a beautiful drive, eight miles, Cousin Henry says; but really, I could not think it more than six. A great part of the way, you know, dear Mamma, is wide, open heath. Not like the Sussex Downs, no, hardly so pretty as they are, but it is not all fat. There are many hollows, and the furze-bushes are beautiful, and there is one place where the turnpike road cuts a gentleman's park in two, and on either side are the largest thorns, full of pink blossoms. When we were jogging along on the bare heath without any hedges, I was most amused with the larks. They were springing up from the ground and singing overhead, such a cheering song! It seemed if they had the whole sky to themselves. Then the plovers came out from the furze-bushes. And by-and-by we went over a rabbit warren, and I do believe we saw hundreds of rabbits. Fanny liked them very much. When we had reached the highest part of the heath, Cousin Henry stopped the fat horse for a minute, and asked me if I saw anything particular at a distance. I looked towards the spot to which he pointed ; and there, a very long way off, was something that looked like two or three churches in one, with very irregular towers. There was very low ground between us and it, but the building stood high. I dare say you know, Mamma, what it was. Only think of it being Ely Minster! It almost took away my breath. So that low ground was what used to be covered with water, and it helped to form the Isle of Ely. And so, really, we were looking down upon the “Camp of Refuge,” where Here

THE MONTHLY PACKET.

tormenting too. I felt such a wish to stop and look at some those prettr churches, and beautiful parks and woods. It is rathe

Don't you remember, “ Mammy dear,” (rou know I must say sometimes.) that pretty little roadside inn at Belford, where 7 slept one night when we were going to Bath? I was a small de of a thing, then; but, Mammy, don't think I shall ever forget the bowling-green and the arbour, which the maid called harbour, and the spreading elm, with the seat under it. Well

, this does not reh you about my journey in this present summer of 1847, when you little Lucy is become a great big girl, “ And little Lucy must be called no more."

When Fanny and I got to the station, we found it was ja

ward, the trare Saxon, held out so long! Cousin Henry says that

the whole of that wide fen conntry we saw below us was the tract tiresome only to wait a minute or two at a bustling railway statig i kineri alle Hoiland. There, you know, Mamma, the salt water

clube, am the waves dashed against several islands besides Ely;
and tizie bag, long ago, lived the Queen and Abbess Ethelfeda.
What a dil time that was! Cousin Henry says it was in the
Fear el car Lord 600 that the alibey was founded, and the great
chanh sai tuilt by St. Wilfred, Bishop of York. Cousin Henry
says he was the bishop who brought over from Rome painted glass,
25magas, and artificers. Cousin Henry knows the whole story
3x well as if he had lived at the time, almost, and told me about
the naveliering Danes coming, in the year 870, and murdering tlie
meaks asi nuns, and almost destroying the abbey. But then, a

years afterwards, came a good king, and a bishop, who as you told us it would be. Cousin Henry was there with the built it up again much handsomer than before. And Cousin Henry

Bapy the tibi wonderful part is, that the church was built of great Lazises of surde, such as are not to be found anywhere near, and all me kave been brought in blocks by sea, some of thein from the kland of Purbecke And there was a high tower and a steeple, wtich erved as a landmark through the whole fen country. It nak be a very large cathedral, for we could see it plainly at a dis

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waiting for us. He is so good-natured; he had brought all sorts of funny cloaks and hoods with him, in case it should rain. It was treat to get into the open gig, and be able to look right and left and all about us, after being boxed up in the railway carriage. had a beautiful drive, eight miles, Cousin Henry says; but realls, 1 could not think it more than six. A great part of the way, you know, dear Mamma, is wide, open heath. Not like the Susses Downs, no, hardly so pretty as they are, but it is not all flat. There

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are many hollows, and the furze-bushes are beautiful, and there is'Hul, dear Mamma, we were going on gently all this time, every

ha and then looking at the noble old minster, and thinking fine

ups about it; bat when we came within two miles of Beckham,

thit wantry was different to that we had passed through. Now it

1

F2 inclosed. It was fat, but cultivated as neatly as a garden.
The even rows of wheat were waving backwards and forwards.

Citais Henry pointed to them, and quoted a line of poetry,

one place where the turnpike road ents a gentleman's park in twa! and on either side are the largest thorns, full of pink blossom When we were jogging along on the bare heath without an hedges, I was most amused with the larks. They were springir: up from the ground and singing overhead, such a cheering song! li seemed as if they had the whole sky to themselves. Then the plovers came out from the furze-bushes. And by-and-by we wes

“And yellow harvests wase their golden grain."

Fanny liked them very much. When we had reached the highest sto Lucy," he said, " you will see something of country business," over a rabbit warren, and I do believe we saw hundreds of rabbits, Ske, very soon, he says, it will be quite ripe enough to cut, and “then,

pretty parsonages ; and gardens, gay with pinks and roses.

We passed one or two handsome churches built with Aint stones ; And once we had to cross a village green, half covered with *** and sheep. All the cross-roarls which went over the green

part of the heath, Cousin Henry stopped the fat horse for a minut ; and asked me if I saw anything particular at a distance. I louke towards the spot to which he pointed; and there, a very long wa off

, was something that looked like two or three churches in ane with very irregular towers. There was very low ground between u

hai a pate to them, that the sbeep and cattle might not stray; and and it, but the building stood high. I dare say you know, Mamak Cousin Henry threw a penny to a child who ran a long way to open

the gate for us. Just then a shower of rain came on, and Henry made us put on cloaks and hoods, and held the large umbrella over 2. He said it was too heavy for us to hold, but he gave me the whip

into my owu harid, because he had the reins too to take care

what it was. Only think of it being Ely Minster! It almost tos away my breath. So that low ground was what used to be covers' with water, and it helped to form the Isle of Ely. And so, reais we were looking down upon the “Camp of Refuge," where Bett

of; but he said I must not whip the great horse unless he told me to do so, for sometimes he was a little frisky; and, indeed, once he did canter a little way, which was great fun. Was it not foolish in Fanny? She was frightened, and began to cry whenever the horse went a little faster. I wouldn't be such a coward as she is for all the world.

in a very little while after this, Cousin Henry called out, “ Here we are !” and there was a white gate, which somebody threw open, and presently we were close to the door of Uncle Joe's house, and there he, and Aunt, and Cousiu Eliza, stood ready for us. I like Uncle very much. He called out quite loud, “Well, girls! who should have thought of seeing you here? Come, jump out!" and he maile us each jump into his arms, and gave us each a loud, snacking kiss. Fan was frightened again, and wriggled out of his arms, so he said, “Mey-day!" and laughed heartily. Uncle has a kind, merry face, so dark and sun-burnt. His beard is cer. tainly rather rough, and he does not mind wearing an old hat. The one he goes about the fields in has hardly any nap left upon it, and then he has a straw one for hot days, so very brown!

It was within a little of dinner-time, which is never later than one o'clock, and sometimes half-past twelve, in hay and barvesttime. Aunt said our things should be brought up-stairs, but we must not unpack or dress at all, for Uncle was in a hurry to get his dinner over; so we did but wash our faces and hands, and smooth our hair, and run down as fast as possible. Dinner looked a little 0:11-not like ours at home. There is pudding before meat; and Unele does give very large slices. I could not eat all mine, and he called me a chicken. After dinner, as soon as lie had said grace, we all got up and went where we liked. Cousin Eliza said garden was best, and she showed us an arbour, where we sat, and she brought us gooseberries and currants on a cabbage leaf.

• You know we had set of so very early in the morning, that we were rather tired; anı, indeed, I was glad when Aunt came out and said she should like us to lie down for a little time in the afternoon, and then we could unpack our clothes before tea. Dear Mamına, you said very little to us about Aunt, but we are sure yon must love her dearly. What a sweet voice she has! All the time she was speaking, I kept hoping she would go on, for it was like pleasant music to the ear. And then her calm, bright eyes! I don't think I ever saw quite such eyes. They are perfect hazel, and her shining brown hair lies on her white forehead as if it could never be ruffled; and her neat simple cap, almost like a Quaker's for plainness, and her nice little silk mits on her delicate hands.

horse went a little faster. I wouldn't be such a coward as des
for all the world.
'In a very little while after this

, Cousin Henry called me

out!" and he made us each jump into his arms, and gave us tik

* All the eresing I hope she did not think me very rude or very of; but he said I must not whip the great horse unless hea mi to do so

, for sometimes he was a little frisky; and, inde contentions, but I could do little besides wateh her. Every thing she he did canter a little way, which was great fun. Was it not toy dil vai si prtly and simply done. I am sure she loves Uuele in Fanny? She was frightened , and began to ers whenereistehen und treh he is so rough and diferent. He is very fond

and proat of ber, bat she looks proud of him too.

il ilink this letter is long enongh, but only I must tell you that

kere Amt is the family reader. I thought it seemed strange at "llere we are !" and there was a white gate, which some' first, bu Uncle makes her do it. He says he is never tired of listhrew open, and presently we were close to the door of Uncle Jy eng to the words as she utters them, and that he knows he is house, and there he, and Aunt, and Cousin Eliza, stood readirigh and loud, and likes the servants to hear them from her; but us. I like Uncle viry much. He called out quite loud, is firtina, if she is out, or very busy, he will do it, “and very girls! who should hare thought of seeing you here? Come, jo tie too." Aant says.

"What a useful girl Cousin Eliza is! Do you know, I think I ci his arms, so he said, “Lley-day!" and laughed heartily. (nt that at this time of year she gathers all the fruit, and most of the a loud, snacking kiss. Fan was frightened again, and wrimodu berer SOX a girl do 89 much; and so well too. I have found out

vegetables

, and that in the hot mornings she is in the garden by tainly rather rough, and he does not mind wearing an old sex ock, nathering before the sun bears great power. Also seveThe one he goes about the fields in has hardly any nap lefi aeg tal of the Power-bells are her charge; and she waters the flowers,

ead ties them ap, and cuts off the dead ones, and the garden ris one o'clock, and sometimes half-past twelve, in hay and barreted and assists in making cakes, and puddings, and pies, and does

It was within a little of dinner-time, which is never later the a beautiful order. Besides this, she helps Aunt with the accounts, time. Aunt said our tbings should be brought up-stairs, but pel teulen ord; and she visits in the village at the school, and among must not upack or dress at all, for Uncle was in a hurry to get him the past, when anything is wanted; and she is only just a little our hair, and run down as fast as possible. Dinner looked a link tired by early bed-time. I am sure I wish I could be dinner over; so we did but wash our faces and hands, and smooth te-as perhaps, so that it is hard to get hold of her for any talk; oil--not like ours at home. There is pudding before meat; bali 2 seful. I hope she will let me help her all I can while we Inck does give very large slices. I could not eat all mine, ardi e We all got up and went where we liked. Cousin Eliza said garus U and see for Fanny's letter, for it is time they should go.

Yours, dear Mamma,

Lucy.'

has a kini, merry face, so dark and sun-burnt. His beard in

an i then he has a straw one for hot days, so rery brown!

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"dai now I mast leave off. What a long letter it is! I must

called me a chicken. After dinner, as soon as he had said ga,

MINOR CARES.

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was best, and she showed us an arbour, where we sat, and so bronght us gooseberries and currants on a cabbage leaf.

Yon kno:r we had set off so very early in the morning, that e were rather tired; and, indeed, I was glad when Aunt came is| and said she shoull like us to lie down for a little time in afternoon, and then we could unpack aur clothes before tea. Det Jamina, you said very little to us about Aunt, but we are sure sa must love her dearly. What a sweet voice she has! All the tigshe was speaking, I kept hoping she would go on, for it was la pleasant music to the car. And then her calm, bright eyes! don't think I ever saw quite such eyes. They are perfect hazel

, *** her shining brown hair lies on her white forehead as if it can never be rufiled; and her neat simple cap, almost like a Quaker's

E. WELL, dear, it has all gone off beautifully, thanks
to your nice arrangements. Now do sit down and rest.
S. I do not think I need look after anybody now, they

their own way, and Ellen is proud to do the
cards. I wrote all the directions yesterday; it is only

nluinness, and her nice little silk mits on her delicate hands.

E. I long to see you quiet, for you must be in a whirl.

elipping them in.

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S. Is Mamma in the garden ?

E. Yes, sitting with Jane, who will just suit her How quiet and sensible it all was! nothing to take one' attention away from that dear child, or to oppress her. hardly believed that you could have carried your wishe as to that point. People, now-a-days, are so carried by custom against their own feelings.

S. It was difficult, but, as everybody deprecated fuss and especially the parties themselves, it seemed absurd to give in to it. Mamma had many misgivings, because shi always thinks what she is not equal to must be right and Papa was rather troubled about So-and-so not being asked, till I frightened him with a vision of Gunter Then you see there were no parents, and the sister was too glad not to come out of Yorkshire, so we had only ourselves to offend. Price was so charmed to do the luncheon all herself, that it kept her in good humour throughout ; and the Lowes manage all the village dinner That was a great stroke of diplomacy too. I could hardly believe, when we got into church, that all had gone so smoothly, and was so solemn and undisturbed dear Agnes evidently with her whole mind in the service, and seeing and thinking of nothing else.

E. I hardly expected her to be so self-possessed, for she is excitable by nature.

S. Yes ; but she has great power over herself ; and I was so pleased with the way in which, from the first, she begged me to get everything for her, because she could not think about such triles now; whereas she used to be so particular about her dress, that it ended in her choosing for us both.

E. That was very nice, though it gave you more to do.

S. I did it with a good-will when I found it was shielding her from vanities, and that she was always satisfied. When I once got into it, it was no worse than a grand, penny club-day.

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