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Giles, or Ægidius, an Athenian by birth; but settling in France, with Cæfarius bishop of Arles, and dedicating himself to a religious life, he obtained the favour of the king, who made him abbot of Nismes. He died in the year 795.

Eunurchus, or Ævortius, bishop of Orleans in France; to which dignity it is said he was chosen by the miraculous appearance of a dove alighting upon his head, during the time of the election of a bishop of Orleans, and thus manifesting the approbation of Heaven in his favour. He died about the year 380.

I Nativity of the Virgin Mary. The Romish church believes that a concert of angels was heard at the birth of Christ's mother; for which reason they confecrated the day. Pope Innocent IV. appointed an octave lo it, and Gregory XI. added a vigil.

|| Holy Crofs. A festival instituted in commemoration of the bringing back to Jerutalem, by the Emperor Heraclius, in the year 615, a great fragment of the holy cross which had been taken thence by Cotrhoes king of Persia, who plundered the holy city. Heraclius pursued and defeated him, and restored the fragment to its place.

Lambert, bishop of Utrecht, in the time of Pepin I. of France; a zealous prelate, who was asfaflinated by the contrivance of a loose woman, concubine to the king's grandfon, becaufe he had reproved the prince for his connection with her. He was canonized shortly after his murder, but did not obtain the dedication of a day to his memory, till Robert bishop of Leeds procured an order for it, in a general chapter of the Cistertian order, A. D. 1240.

& St. Cyprian, bishop of Carthage, A. D. 248. An African, and heathen, but converted to the faith, which he set his seal to by becoming a martyr in the Decian persecution.--It should seem by the Romilh Breviary, however, that this day was confecrated to another St. Cyprian, of Antioch, a deacon and martyr. In his death (which was by frying in a pan) he had for his companion one Justina, a beautiful Christian virgin, and the object of his attachment. Unconquered by tortures, they died profelling their religion, A. D. 272.

+ St. Jerome. A celebrated Christian divine, born in Palestine; first monk, and then ordained presbyter, A.D. 378. He is remarkable for having translated all the canonical Scriptures of the Old Testament out of the Hebrew into Latin; all which books the Jews themselves received in his day as canonical. His learning was great, his application and diligence excelfve, and his zeal ardent. He died A. D. 422, aged 80.

WITH THE TABLE OF LESSONS.

SEPTEMBER hath xxx Days.

7e 17 Id.

JOY

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11

12

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Giles, or Ægidius, an Athenian by birth; but settling in France, with Cæfarius bishop of Arles, and dedicating himself to a religious life, he obtained the favour of the king, wbo made him abbot of Nismes. He died in the year 795.

Eunurchus, or Ævortius, bishop of Orleans in France; to which dignity it is said he was chosen by the miraculous appearance of a dove alighting upon his head, during the time of the election of a bishop of Orleans, and thus manifesting the approbation of Heaven in his favour. He died about the year 380.

I Nativity of the Virgin Mary. The Romish church believes that a concert of angels was heard at the birth of Christ's mother; for which reason they confecrated the day. Pope Innocent IV. appointed an octave to it, and Gregory XI. added a vigil.

|| Holy Crofs. A festival instituted in commemoration of the bringing back to Jerusalem, by the Emperor Heraclius, in the year 615, a great fragment of the holy cross which had been taken thence by Cotrhoes king of Persia, who plundered the holy city. Heraclius pursued and defeated him, and restored the fragment to its place.

Lambert, bishop of Utrecht, in the time of Pepin I. of France; a zealous prelate, who was assassinated by the contrivance of a loote woman, concubine to the king's grandfon, because he had reproved the prince for his connection with her. He was canonized shortly after his murder, but did not obtain the dedication of a day to his memory, till Robert bishop of Leeds procured an order for it, in a general chapter of the Cistertian order, A. D. $240.

9 St. Cyprian, bishop of Carthage, A. D. 248. An African, and heathen, but converted to the faith, which he set his seal to by becoming a martyr in the Decian persecution. It should seem by the Romith Breviary, however, that this day was confecrated to another St. Cyprian, of Antioch, a deacon and martyr. In his death (which was by frying in a pan) he had for his companion one Justina, a beautiful Christian virgin, and the object of his attachment. Unconquered by tortures, they died profelling their religion, A. D. 272.

+ St. Jerome. A celebrated Christian divine, born in Palestine; first monk, and then ordained presbyter, A.D. 378. He is remarkable for having translated all the canonical Scriptures of the Old Testament out of the Hebrew into Latin; all which books the Jews themselves received in his day as canonical. His learning was great, his application and diligence excesive, and his zeal ardcnt. He died A. D. 422, aged 80.

WITH THE TABLE OF LESSONS.

OCTOBER hath xxxi Days.

315 Non.

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* Remigius, bishop of Rheims in France. He is esteemed by many the Apostle of that country, having baptized Clovis, the king of that country; who, in the fimplicity of his heart, and ardour of a new convert, exclaimed, on hearing a sermon on the sufferings of Christ: “ If I had been " there with my Franks, it should not have happened.” He died at the advanced age of 96, A. D. 535.

+ Faith, Virgin and Martyr. Little is known of her, except that the was born at Pais de Gavre in France, and suffered a cruel martyrdom, A. D. 290.

1 St. Denys, or Dionysius the Areopagite, was converted to Christianity by St. Paul, (vide Acts xvï.); one of the judges of the famous Athenian court called the Areopagus, but afterwards bishop of Athens, and a mar. tyr. The French affert he was the first who preached the Gospel in their country, and therefore claim him as their tutelar faint.

| Translation of King Edward the Confeffor. The youngest son of King Ethelred, and succeeded to the English crown in 1042. The title of Confeffor was conferred on him by the Pope, for his agreeing to pay the Roman Pontiff a yearly tribute of acknowledgment, called Rome-Scot, or Peter-Pence. He merited more of his country, however, for collecting and digesting a body of useful laws. At the coronation of the Kings of England, his chair and crown, staff and spurs, are still used.

Etheldreda. Daughter of Anna, king of the East-Angles, and born A.D. 630, at a village in Suffolk. She married Toubert, an East-Anglian earl; and on his death took King Egfrid for her second husband. Upon the death of Toubert, the INe of Ely became her sole property, where the founded a convent, and built the conventual church. After a residence of zwelve years with her last husband, and having no children, the obtained permiffion to take the veil; which she did at Coldingham abbey, Yorkthire, under Ebba, daughter of King Ethelfred. She died abbess of Ely, June 23d, 679, and her name was afterwards corrupted into that of St. Audrey.

Crispin and Crispianus: martyrs and brothers, born at Rome towards the latter end of the third century. They travelled into France, in order to preach the Gospel, and that they might not be chargeable to their hearers, they worked as fhoemakers, and thus supported themselves. In consequence of this they are considered as the futelar faints of that trade. They were beheaded at Soissons about the year 303.

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