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Reign of Queen ELIZABETH, to the SETTLEMENT

under KING WILLIAM.

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Extracted from PARLIAMENTARY RECORDS, STATE Acts,

and other Authentic Materials.

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Printed for LU KE WHITE, No. 86, Dame-street.

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1. THE Marquis of Ormond returns to Ireland.

II. His excellency treats of a peace with the confederate

catholics.

III. The peace of 1648 concluded and proclaimed.

6

IV. The happy effects of this peace. Ormond's defeat at

Rathmines. Cromwell's arrival in Ireland.

V. Cromwell's policy to reduce Ireland.

VI. Owen O'Nial

submits to the peace. Inchiquin's forces

revolt to the rebels.

16

VII. The Marquis of Ormond desires leave to quit the

kingdom.

22

VIII. The king is invited to Scotland.

24

IX. The king secretly regrets this measure.

27

X. Proceedings of the bishops at James-town.

28

XI. Ormond approved and advised the king's agreement

with the Scots.

31

XII. The real cause of the clergy's proceedings at James-town. 33

XIII. The clergy's proceedings at James-town disapproved of

by the generality of the Irish catholics.

XIV. The presoytery of Bangor's proceedings on the peace. 39

XV. The total deféction of the protestant forces.

42

XVI. Treaty with the Duke of Lorrain.

44

XVII. The treaty with the Duke of Lorrain considered.

В оок IX.

I. The Marquis of Clanrickard leaves Ireland, now

entirely subject to the English rebels.

54

II. The transplantation of the Irish into Connaught.

III. High courts of justice in Ireland.

61

IV. Henry Cromwell's administration in Ireland. 69

V. Contrivances of Sir Charles Cocte and Lord Broghill. 73

VI. Commisioners sent from Irelard; their characters

and designs.

75

VII. The Irish catholics excluded out of the general aci

act

of oblivion.

VIII. A proclamation publijþed against the Irish.

IX. The Irifto parliament.

79

VOL. II.

A

X. Falfo

76

78
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X. False reports of a conspiracy among the Irish cons-

dered. The effects of these reports.

XI. The parties principally suspected of this conspiracy,

voluntarily appear before the lords justices, in

order to detečt the forgery.

85

XII. Loyalty of the catholic nobility and gentry of Ire-

land at this juncture.

86

XIII. The Irish clergy's remonftrance of loyalty.

91

XIV. The Duke of Ormond's design in permitting this

meeting of the Irish clergy.

94

XV. The king confesses his obligation to make good the

peace of the year 1648.

XVI. Ormond's reasons for his opposition to the Irish con-

fidered.

XVII. The Earl of Orrery abuses the king's confidence,

with respect to the settlement of Ireland.

XVIII. The affairs of Ireland brought before the English

council.

103

XIX. The fufferings of the Irish set forth by their agents

before the king and council.

105

XX. A court of claims appointed in Ireland.

XXI. The conditions of the innocency and nocency of the

claimants.

113

XXII. The time limited for holding these courts, found too

port, and not suffered to be enlarged.

115

XXIII. An enlargement of time for hearing all the clai-

maints, by whom hindered.

118

XXIV. Some reflections on the foregoing acts.

123

XXV. A dangerous conspiracy of the puritans.

126

XXVI. The Duke of Ormond apologizes for the favour he

had fbewn to the Cromwellian party in Ireland. 128

XXVII. The probable motives of the Duke of Ormond's

past and present conduct, with respect to the Irish. 131

XXVIII. The Duke of Ormond befriends the Irish.

135

CHAP.

PAGE.

VIII. Irish rapparees.

161

IX. A conspiracy of the protestants of Dublin against the

the government.

167

X. The difarming of the protestants further considered. 170

XI. General De Rosen's cruelty before Derry considered. 171

XII. King James countermands De Rosen's order.

176

XIII. The protestants of Ireland were not deprived of their

churches by King James, as Dr. King sets forth. 181

XIV. King William's treatment of the episcopal clergy in

Scotland, compared with King James's behaviour

towards the protestant clergy in Ireland.

XV. The true cause of the decline of the protestant

religion in Ireland in the reign of King James II. 186

XVI. The perplexity of the established"clergy of Ireland

after the coronation of King William.

189

XVII. The established clergy of Ireland laboured under a

particular difficulty on this occasion.

191

XVIII. The good faith of King Willian's and King James's

officers compared.

193

XIX. Å sort sketch of the cruelties inflicted on the Irish

prisoners in this war; and also on those even

under protection.

198

XX. Surrender of Limerick, with the articles of capitu-

lation,

STATE OF THE CATHOLICS OF IRELAND. .

I. Infringement of the articles of Limerick.

225

II. Severe laws made against catholics.

228

II. The catholics of Limerick cruelly treated.

231

IV. Penal laws to prevent the further growth of popery. 233

V. The same subject continued.

237

VI. Persecution of the catholics in the reign of Q. Anne. 243

VII. Penal laws of discovery and gavel-kind enacted. 246

VIII. Reasons aligned for making those laws.

249

IX. Persecutions in the reign of King George I.

251

X. The catholics address his majesty King George II. 255

XI. Penal laws enforced in the reign of King George II. 257

XII. The conduct of the catholics of Ireland in the time of

the rebellion in Scotland, 1745.

260

XIII. A bill for naturalizing the Jews passes the house of

commons.

262

XIV. The catholics address the lord lieutenant.

263

XV. Tbe catholics of Ireland, pressed by penal laws, form

an humble remonstrance to be presented to his majesty. 265

XVI. Tumults in Munster considered.

271

XVII. The fame subject continued.

274

XVIII. Reflections

.

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