Le Morte Darthur: Sir Thomas Malory's Book of King Arthur and His Noble Knights of the Round Table: the Text of Caxton

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1901 - Arthurian romances - 509 pages

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Page 436 - Then Sir Bedivere cried: Ah my lord Arthur, what shall become of me, now ye go from me and leave me here alone among mine enemies? Comfort thyself...
Page xxvi - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain; But, with the motion of all elements, Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page xlvii - When Sir Ector beheld the sword he returned again and came to the church, and there they...
Page 443 - Morte d'Arthur. — SIR THOMAS MALORY'S BOOK OF KING ARTHUR AND OF HIS NOBLE KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE. The original Edition of CAXTON, revised for Modern Use. With an Introduction by Sir EDWARD STRACHEY, Bart. pp. xxxvii., 509. ' 'It is with perfect confidence that we recommend this edition of the old romance to every class of readers.
Page 442 - Launcelot, he said, thou were head of all Christian knights, and now I dare say, said Sir Ector, thou Sir Launcelot, there thou liest, that thou were never matched of earthly knight's hand.
Page 436 - Bedivere, take thou Excalibur, my good sword, and go with it to yonder water side, and when thou comest there, I charge thee throw my sword in that water, and come again, and tell me what thou there seest. My lord, said Bedivere, your commandment shall be done, and lightly bring you word again.
Page xxi - ... every man will say it is a great cruelty to put to death such honest persons, who by their own wills put themselves into your grace to save their company.
Page xiii - Hath been derived down to us, and received In a succession for the noblest way Of breeding up our youth, in letters, arms, Fair mien, discourses, civil exercise, And all the blazon of a gentleman ? Where can he learn to vault, to ride, to fence, To move his body gracefuller, to speak His language purer, or to tune his mind Or manners more to the harmony of nature, Than in these nurseries of nobility?

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