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Mr. BATEs. Has any effort been made to build up a case and present it to the Congress?

Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Limiting the number of taxi licenses?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.

Mr. BATES. It seems to me that where you get to the point that 3,000 men are forced to give up their cabs, it is a pretty serious situation.

Mr. HATHAWAY. It is a pretty serious situation; it is in Congress now, and it has been for a period of years. Each time it comes up and they have never done anything about it. But it is in the Congress at the present time.

Mr. Bates. There is a bill at the present time in Congress to limit the cabs?

Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Thank you, Mr. Hathaway.
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Mrs. Lavona Haynes.

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STATEMENT OF LAVONA HAYNES, TAXICAB DRIVER,

WASHINGTON, D. C. Mrs. HAYNES. Good morning, Mr. Chairman Mr. Bates. We are very glad to see you.

Mrs. HAYNES. I own and operate my own cab. I am the mother of three youngsters and I do provide a living by operating my own cab.

I feel like an increase in the tax will be a burden on me as well as a lot of other drivers. Of course, as you know, it will probably cost me another $30 a year—the increase in the tax-and I feel as if that would be at least four more days added to my expense per year, and well, it is pretty big now, because I put in about 28 days a month at from 10 to 14 hours a day, and already I am paying in gasoline taxes something between $175 and $190 a year.

I do know we need improvements in our streets and roads; that is true. But why cannot we do it as we do in our homes? We all-most of us, anyway, if we work for a living—we buy it with a down payment, and finish it up as the years go on. After all, streets last a long time. Why cannot we do our streets that way?

Mr. Bates. You drive 10 to 14 hours a day?
Mrs. HAYNES. I sure do.

Mr. BATEs. Is that the common practice of other taxicab drivers in the District, Mr. Hathaway?

Mr. HATHAWAY. No, sir, Mr. Chairman; there is a Public Utilities rule saying that no cab driver can operate a cab over 12 hours a day; that is the law.

Mr. Bates. Well, she meant to say from 10 to 12 hours a day.

Mr. HATHAWAY. I understood you to ask if it was a common practice to drive over 12. I was merely stating it was against the law to do it; but they do drive 12.

Mr. BATES. Twelve hours a day.

Let me ask a question, sort of impersonally. What does the taxi driver in the District consider to be a fair income or average earnings a day?

Mr. HATHAWAY. Well, the only record that I have—and I have not driven a cab for some time—I understand the Federal Income Tax

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Bureau regulates at $45 a week for the average cab driver, the wages or earnings.

Mr. BATEs. Forty-five dollars a week!
Mr. HATHAWAY. That is the only figure I have.
Mr. BATES. That is net?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir; as I understand it.
Mr. BATES. Net ?

Mr. HATHAWAY. But I do not feel that they are actually making that, but that is what they seem to think they are, and that is the onlyMr. Bates. What do you think it is? BATES

? Mr. HATHAWAY. I do not know. Mr. Bates. Do they give any personal secrets away?

Mr. HATHAWAY. Well, you have two types of people, Mr. Chairman: You have the ones who are saying they make a lot and the ones who say they are not making a \iving; but I would say in the neighborhood of $5 a day.

Mr. Bates. Five dollars a day?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Net?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes.
Mr. BATES. Six days a week?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Bates. Do you mean to tell me that the taxi drivers are making only $30 a week?

Mr. HATHAWAY. That is right, exactly right. But if you take into consideration how the taxicab industry has grown during the war, you can see that it is absolutely possible. As I said before, it was somewhere in the neighborhood of–how many would you say were licensed during—before the inspection?

Mr. ALDEN T. KEETING (Yellow Cab Co. of D. C., Inc.). It is near 10,000, sir.

Mr. HATHAWAY. Is that what it is? I said nine five.
Mr. BATEs. And 3,000 gave up their licenses, is that it?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Somewhere in that neighborhood.

Mr. KEETING. Speaking for the Yellow Cab Co., we operate a thousand cabs, and we lost, I think, 31 out of that total.

Mr. Bates. Then, if you have a thousand cabs and you only lost 31; and if you had 10,000, you would lose approximately 300.

Mr. KEETING. I am just speaking of my own fleet.

Mr. HATHAWAY. Mr. Keeting might point out that he has the bestequipped fleet in the city.

Mr. KEETING. Mr. Chairman, I do have four of my drivers here, and some of those questions you were asking of Mr. Hathaway could, perhaps, be answered by them since they would be in a better position to know that.

Mr. Bates. What do you have to say yourself, Mr. Keeting?

Mr. KEETING. I have a brief statement, sir, which I would like to file, and I would like to go along with the chairman in his request for making this meeting as brief as possible, and I would like to introduce these drivers.

Mr. Bates. I was just getting to that question, because I think in the District of Columbia from my observation, and from the observa

tion of practically every member of Congress, that the caliber of your cab drivers in the District is way up above any community I know.

Mr. KEETING. It certainly is, sir. Mr. BATES. And it seems to me pretty unfair to ask them to drive 10 and 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, for $30 a week.

Mr.KEETING. I would like to have you ask those boys tha question.

Mr. BATES. I am on the District Committee, but I wish I was on the subcommittee, and I think I would go into this very thoroughly.

Mr. KEETING. When you talk in that tone of voice, I wish you were, too, sir.

Mr. BATES. In fact, I think I have already talked to one of the men in thewhat do they call it—the public utilities here about it.

Mr. KEETING. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATEs. I think it ought to be gone into.
Mr. KEETING. It certainly ought to, sir.

Mr. BATES. If you are going to maintain the caliber of the drivers here in the District and expect

men to have a decent living from it and get service, why, you have to pay for it.

Is that all you have to say, Mrs. Haynes? Mrs. HAYNES. That is all. Mr. BATES. Thank you very much. Mrs. HAYNES. Thank you. Mr. BATES. Is Mr. Humphreys here? STATEMENT OF WILLIAM E. HUMPHREYS, CHAIRMAN, LEGISLA

TIVE COMMITTEE OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TRUCKING ASSOCIATION, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Mr. HUMPHREYS. Mr. Chairman, my name is William E. Humphreys, and I am the president of the Jacobs Transfer Co., operating 200 units. I am also chairman of the legislative committee of the District of Columbia Trucking Association, Inc., and I represent 1,400 trucks in that association, 59 carriers, and 150 associated members. We consume 3,000,000 gallons of gasoline each year.

I am here today to represent that organization at the direction of its executive committee, to voice its opposition to any increase in the gasoline tax in the District of Columbia.

Nobody likes to feel the pinch of an increase in taxes. But I am not here today to holler "ouch” for myself nor for the trucks of this city.

I have come here to point to a basic principle of street and highway finance, which seems to have been lost sight of by the people who propose an increase in the gasoline tax and who, by doing just that, still further aggravate a wrong that has too long existed in the District of Columbia.

Gentlemen, you are aware, I am sure, as Joseph B. Eastman pointed out in his intensive study and inquiry into the public aids to transportation, that

Highways and streets are useful in many ways that are not related to the operation of motor vehicles; there is a certain minimum standard of highway and street construction which would be essential for the conduct of society and the maintenance of a reasonable standard of living had there never been a motor vehicle.

While obvious, these facts are sometimes overlooked in discussions of the proper allocations of street and highway costs.

Bureau regulates at $45 a week for the average cab driver, the wages or earnings.

Mr. BATEs. Forty-five dollars a week!
Mr. HATHAWAY. That is the only figure I have.
Mr. BATES. That is net?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir; as I understand it.
Mr. BATEs. Net?

Mr. HATHAWAY. But I do not feel that they are actually making that, but that is what they seem to think they are, and that is the only

Mr. BATES. What do you think it is?
Mr. HATHAWAY. I do not know.
Mr. Bates. Do they give any personal secrets away?

Mr. HATHAWAY. Well, you have two types of people, Mr. Chairman: You have the ones who are saying they make a lot and the ones who say they are not making a living; but I would say in the neighborhood of $5 a day.

Mr. Bates. Five dollars a day?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Net?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes.
Mr. BATES. Six days a week?
Mr. HATHAWAY. Yes, sir.

Mr. BATEs. Do you mean to tell me that the taxi drivers are making only $30 a week?

Mr. HATHAWAY. That is right, exactly right. But if you take into consideration how the taxicab industry has grown during the war, you can see that it is absolutely possible. As I said before, it was somewhere in the neighborhood of-how many would you say were licensed during-before the inspection!

Mr. ALDEN T. KEETING (Yellow Cab Co. of D. C., Inc.). It is near 10,000, sir.

Mr. HATHAWAY. Is that what it is? I said nine five.
Mr. BATEs. And 3,000 gave up their licenses, is that it!
Mr. HATHAWAY. Somewhere in that neighborhood.

Mr. KEETING. Speaking for the Yellow Cab Co., we operate a thousand cabs, and we lost, I think, 31 out of that total.

Mr. BATEs. Then, if you have a thousand cabs and you only lost 31; and if you had 10,000, you would lose approximately 300.

Mr. KEETING. I am just speaking of my own fleet.

Mr. HATHAWAY. Mr. Keeting might point out that he has the bestequipped fleet in the city.

Mr. KEETING. Mr. Chairman, I do have four of my drivers here, and some of those questions you were asking of Mr. Hathaway could, perhaps, be answered by them since they would be in a better position to know that.

Mr. BATES. What do you have to say yourself, Mr. Keeting?

Mr. KEETING. I have a brief statement, sir, which I would like to file, and I would like to go along with the chairman in his request for making this meeting as brief as possible, and I would like to introduce these drivers.

Mr. Bates. I was just getting to that question, because I think in the District of Columbia from my observation, and from the observa

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tion of practically every member of Congress, that the caliber of your cab drivers in the District is way up above any community I know.

Mr. KEETING. It certainly is, sir.

Mr. BATES. And it seems to me pretty unfair to ask them to drive 10 and 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, for $30 a week.

Mr. KEETING. I would like to have you ask those boys that question. Mr. BATEs. I am on the District Committee, but I wish I was on the subcommittee, and I think I would go into this very thoroughly.

Mr. KEETING. When you talk in that tone of voice, I wish you were, too, sir.

Mr. BATES. In fact, I think I have already talked to one of the men in the—what do they call it—the public utilities here about it.

Mr. KEETING. Yes, sir.
Mr. Bares. I think it ought to be gone into.
Mr. KEETING. It certainly ought to, sir.

Mr. BATES. If you are going to maintain the caliber of the drivers here in the District and expect men to have a decent living from it and get service, why, you have to pay for it.

Is that all you have to say, Mrs. Haynes? Mrs. HAYNES. That is all. Mr. BATES. Thank you very much. Mrs. HAYNES. Thank you. Mr. BATES. Is Mr. Humphreys here? STATEMENT OF WILLIAM E. HUMPHREYS, CHAIRMAN, LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TRUCKING ASSOCIATION, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Mr. HUMPHREYS. Mr. Chairman, my name is William E. Humphreys, and I am the president of the Jacobs Transfer Co., operating 200 units. I am also chairman of the legislative committee of the District of Columbia Trucking Association, Inc., and I represent 1,400 trucks in that association, 59 carriers, and 150 associated members. We consume 3,000,000 gallons of gasoline each year.

I am here today to represent that organization at the direction of its executive committee, to voice its opposition to any increase in the gasoline tax in the District of Columbia.

Nobody likes to feel the pinch of an increase in taxes. But I am not here today to holler "ouch” for myself nor for the trucks of this city.

I have come here to point to a basic principle of street and highway finance, which seems to have been lost sight of by the people who propose an increase in the gasoline tax and who, by doing just that, still further aggravate a wrong that has too long existed in the District of Columbia.

Gentlemen, you are aware, I am sure, as Joseph B. Eastman pointed out in his intensive study and inquiry into the public aids to transportation, that

Highways and streets are useful in many ways that are not related to the operation of motor vehicles; there is a certain minimum standard of highway and street construction which would be essential for the conduct of society and the maintenance of a reasonable standard of living had there never been a motor vehicle.

While obvious, these facts are sometimes overlooked in discussions of the proper allocations of street and highway costs.

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