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conducted by the Treasury Department as a tax solution. The revenue which would be derived would greatly lighten the tax burdens, and probably more than any other sources of income.

There should be no real objection to this method of raising revenue as it would be less of a drain on the taxpayer than further increase in taxation.

The old City Hall, now the District Courthouse Building was started from lottery funds as were some of our public schools. Many South American countries conduct lotteries,

Manila, after her independence conducted a lottery to raise revenue. Our American Congress in 1776 conducted a national lottery to finance the Revolutionary War. And a lottery was authorized in Puerto Rico under governmental control.

We must not lose sight of the fact that we have at the present time a tremendous public debt and this will be increased steadily in the future on account of the Veterans' educational program, disability allowances, and pension payments. The revenue from a lottery would help to defray these and other expenses.

Therefore it is sincerely believed by the Washingtonians, that the best solution for our tax problems is enactment of legislation which would provide for a lottery under governmental control and conducted by the Treasury Department.

Many human beings have a gambling instinct which it is most impossible to curb, for you cannot legislate morals in them and certainly legalizing a lottery would not change the morals of these human beings.

Mr. BATEs. Have you any criticism of the District government and of the way they run the District, from the standpoint of efficiency, economy, or otherwise ?

Mrs. TAGGART. I have never criticized the District government. I think that the Commissioners are a good governing body.

Now, may I add something to this suffrage question?

Mr. Bates. No, not at this time. We want to give the people of the District a chance to express themselves with relation to any criticism they have of the District government today. This is the people's day.

Mrs. Taggart. Well, one thing I might suggest is the Recorder of Deeds be placed under the Commissioner, and the Commissioners appoint that person because after all his salary is paid from the taxes from our people. That is one thing I would like to see done.

Mr. BATEs. Thank you, Mrs. Taggart.

Is there anyone else here today who would like to express themselves relative to the way this District government is being administered?

It seems we have given the citizens an ample opportunity to express themselves as to how the District is being run, and perhaps give some suggestions as to how these expenditures could be reduced, and more efficiently developed in the administration of the District government.

Apparently there seems to be quite a general accord that things are being run pretty vell around here.

Unless we hear to the contrary, we must accept it in that spirit.

STATEMENT OF W. ARTHUR SHELTON, WASHINGTON, D. C.

Mr. SHELTON. Concerning the expenditures for highways and for possible subways, and so forth, it seems to me we are in danger and I wanted to cite a little warning for consideration of those problems.

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We are going to run into a great deal of money. We have for a long time been spending a lot of money on asphalt highways here and we could have had better concrete roads and safer in many ways for

perhaps a fifth or less in cost.

We have modified that now on grades where the trucks pull down the other, softer surface grades we have had to go to concrete.

We have not gone far enough, however. What we are in danger of in the face of the present engineering plans is spending immensely more money for underpasses and subways, especially for a small downtown section of the city that merely needs traffic in and out of that area and to and from the home areas.

The local subway as proposed would be of very little use. They would simply be unable to use it.

I understand that Mr. Merrill in his statement before the Public Utilities Commission this week made some statements on that I would like to call that to the attention of the committee, if I could, because they have done a good deal with the traffic and the amount of traffic in those areas, and I do not have that data, but I think if you will give attention to Mr. Merrill's statements of the Capital Transit Co., if you are familiar with the service here, you will realize how much better service we have now than in the last war.

However, they are not even allowed to make the kinds of improve ments they have requested permission to make.

For example, they asked some time ago for a substitution of busses on the northern line out here through Fifteenth and H Streets NE.: it is a very heavily traveled road. They have converted that over to much better rail equipment than they formerly had and put some adiditional busses on for the most distant traffic, but on Connecticut, we have long since taken up all the railways and put in busses entirely. They have more people and less cost of operation, and less hazards, because people had to come down off the curbs into the center with two lanes of busses in the middle and two safeway platforms in addition, making four lines taken right out of the middle of traffic, and then all the traffic from the middle to the curb and to the curb opposite hail to cross the line of people trying to get through that narrow line on that side.

We have eliminated that hazard. We have increased the speed by about 50 percent. It is much better service, more rapid and more frequent, and more regular and more satisfactory, and they go to more places.

That type of improvement will take care of all the congestion we will have in Washington for years. Of course, I do not mean that there will not be some spots.

Now the main point about expenses is we are not going in the right direction. If we start right now we will get somewhere in the end, and we can spend as much money as we want to finally on the roads and have the best roads we can possibly finally make but in the meantime we need it for schools and other things rather than to waste it on an antiquated system that perhaps Philadelphia or Boston found useful years ago, but which today, with modern, efficient, independent bus operation can be done so more dependably, safely, rapidly, and give better service in every way.

The companies are apparently very ready to do that. Formerly we had managers here who were not helpful at all.

I once sat under a predecessor of the present president, when we were asking for a bus line across Rock Creek Park, to connect the two upper sections there, and after we had all finished talking, he rose and he said very calmly that probably sometime there would be bus lines across Rock Creek Park, but that nobody in that room would be living at that time.

I wanted to tell him that we needed just about one death to do away with that.

Mr. Bates. If you have any suggestions to offer relative to improving traffic conditions here, I would suggest you submit them to the committee.

Mr. SHELTON. My suggestion is that we follow the lead that they have taken in Connecticut Avenue, where they have improved the situation so much, taking out the streetcars and put in busses on the curb and improved the capacity of the streets, to relieve the downtown section the same way.

With regard to this Dupont Circle underpass, it is going to cost $100,000 to put the rails underneath, and that money would take out the rails to the Mount Pleasant line, you would put busses on the curb there and increase your space there.

It could go to the Agricultural Building and other buildings that end there and loop back through the same route.

Mr. BATES. I think whatever suggestions you have, you ought to make them to the Traffic Department here and also the District Engineer, who no doubt has maxle extensive study of all those facts.

Mr. SHELTON. I have just finished a paper on it.

Mr. Bates. Those questions will be determined after all the facts presented are put in.

Have you any criticism as to how the District is being run other than that?

Mr. SHELTON. I do not know a great deal about the rest of it. I have been following that transportation considerably. I have been with Public Roads for a number of years, and the Maritime Commission, and have previous railway experience and other experience in transportation.

Mr. BATEs. We would be very glad to call your testimony to the attention of Mr. Whitehurst and also the District Engineer.

Mr. SHELTON. These committees will have to determine the budget. Those highway people are going to spend our money if you do not call them on it.

Mr. BATES. Thank you, Mr. Shelton. Does anyone else desire to be heard today? If not, the meeting will recess until tomorrow morning, when the Commissioners will appear in support of the tax measures filed in Congress for increasing the revenues for the District.

It has been rather surprising to me when we have heard so much criticism generally speaking in the papers and otherwise, of the way the District is being run, that there would be so few residents of the District who come before the committee and give evidence of any deficiencies in the administration of the District.

Apparently there seems to be general accord that a fairly good job has been done.

There is no way this committee or any other committee can get underneath all the facts unless we have a special corps investigate

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We are going to run into a great deal of money. We have for a long time been spending a lot of money on asphalt highways here and we could have had better concrete roads and safer in many ways for

perhaps a fifth or less in cost.

We have modified that now on grades where the trucks pull down the other, softer surface grades we have had to go to concrete.

We have not gone far enough, however. What we are in danger of in the face of the present engineering plans is spending immensely more money for underpasses and subways, especially for a small downtown section of the city that merely needs traffic in and out of that area and to and from the home areas.

The local subway as proposed would be of very little use. They would simply be unable to use it.

I understand that Mr. Merrill in his statement before the Publie Utilities Commission this week made some statements on that I would like to call that to the attention of the committee, if I could, because they have done a good deal with the traffic and the amount of traffic in those areas, and I do not have that data, but I think if you will give attention to Mr. Merrill's statements of the Capital Transit Co., if you are familiar with the service here, you will realize how much better service we have now than in the last war.

However, they are not even allowed to make the kinds of improve. ments they have requested permission to make.

For example, they asked some time ago for a substitution of busses on the northern line out here through Fifteenth and H Streets NE.: it is a very heavily traveled road. They have converted that over to much better rail equipment than they formerly had and put some additional busses on for the most distant traffic, but on Connecticut, we have long since taken up all the railways and put in busses entirely. They have more people and less cost of operation, and less hazards, because people had to come down off the curbs into the center with two lanes of busses in the middle and two safeway platforms in addition, making four lines taken right out of the middle of traffic, and then all the traffic from the middle to the curb and to the curb opposite had to cross the line of people trying to get through that narrow line on that side.

We have eliminated that hazard. We have increased the speed by about 50 percent. It is much better service, more rapid and more frequent, and more regular and more satisfactory, and they go to more places.

That type of improvement will take care of all the congestion we will have in Washington for years. Of course, I do not mean that there will not be some spots.

Now the main point about expenses is we are not going in the right direction. If we start right now we will get somewhere in the end, and we can spend as much money as we want to finally on the roads and have the best roads we can possibly finally make but in the meantime we need it for schools and other things rather than to waste it on an antiquated system that perhaps Philadelphia or Boston found useful years ago, but which today, with modern, efficient, independent bus operation can be done so more dependably, safely, rapidly, and give better service in every way.

The companies are apparently very ready to do that. Formerly we had managers here who were not helpful at all.

I once sat under a predecessor of the present president, when we were asking for a bus line across Rock Creek Park, to connect the two upper sections there, and after we had all finished talking, he rose and he said very calmly that probably sometime there would be bus lines across Rock Creek Park, but that nobody in that room would be living at that time.

I wanted to tell him that we needed just about one death to do away with that.

Mr. Bates. If you have any suggestions to offer relative to improving traffic conditions here, I would suggest you submit them to the committee.

Mr. SHELTON. My suggestion is that we follow the lead that they have taken in Connecticut Avenue, where they have improved the situation so much, taking out the streetcars and put in busses on the curb and improved the capacity of the streets, to relieve the downtown section the same way.

With regard to this Dupont Circle underpass, it is going to cost $100,000 to put the rails underneath, and that money would take out the rails to the Mount Pleasant line, you would put busses on the curb there and increase your space there.

It could go to the Agricultural Building and other buildings that end there and loop back through the same route.

Mr. BATES. I think whatever suggestions you have, you ought to make them to the Traffic Department here and also the District Engineer, who no doubt has made extensive study of all those facts. Mr. SHELTON. I have just finished a paper on it.

Mr. Bates. Those questions will be determined after all the facts presented are put in.

Have you any criticism as to how the District is being run other than that?

Mr. SHELTON. I do not know a great deal about the rest of it. I have been following that transportation considerably. I have been

I with Public Roads for a number of years, and the Maritime Commission, and have previous railway experience and other experience in transportation.

Mr. Bates. We would be very glad to call your testimony to the attention of Mr. Whitehurst and also the District Engineer.

Mr. SHELTON. These committees will have to determine the budget. Those highway people are going to spend our money if you do not call them on it.

Mr. BATES. Thank you, Mr. Shelton. Does anyone else desire to be heard today? If not, the meeting will recess until tomorrow morning, when the Commissioners will appear in support of the tax measures filed in Congress for increasing the revenues for the District.

It has been rather surprising to me when we have heard so much criticism generally speaking in the papers and otherwise, of the way the District is being run, that there would be so few residents of the District who come before the committee and give evidence of any deficiencies in the administration of the District.

Apparently there seems to be general accord that a fairly good job has been done.

There is no way this committee or any other committee can get underneath all the facts unless we have a special corps investigate

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