Victory

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Modern Library, 1921 - Fiction - 340 pages
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Victory was the last of Conrad's novels to be set in the Malay Archipelago. It tells the story of Axel Heyst who, damaged by his dead father's nihilistic philosophy, has retreated from the world of commerce and colonial exploration to live alone on the island of Samburan. But Heyst's solitaryexistence ends when he rescues an English girl from her rapacious patron and brings her back to the island. She in turn recalls him to love and life, until the world breaks in on them once more with tragic consequences. In this love story Conrad created two of his psychologically most complex andcompelling characters in a narrative of great erotic power.This new edition uses the first edition text and includes a new chronology and bibliography.

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Contents

II
3
III
9
IV
20
V
27
VI
34
VII
50
VIII
56
IX
61
XXIV
212
XXV
220
XXVI
231
XXVII
235
XXVIII
244
XXIX
261
XXX
263
XXXI
271

X
63
XI
74
XII
88
XIII
94
XIV
100
XV
112
XVI
128
XVII
145
XVIII
161
XIX
163
XX
172
XXI
175
XXII
190
XXIII
204
XXXII
280
XXXIII
286
XXXIV
294
XXXV
310
XXXVI
316
XXXVII
321
XXXVIII
334
XXXIX
345
XL
352
XLI
369
XLII
377
XLIII
381
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About the author (1921)

Joseph Conrad is recognized as one of the 20th century's greatest English language novelists. He was born Jozef Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski on December 3, 1857, in the Polish Ukraine. His father, a writer and translator, was from Polish nobility, but political activity against Russian oppression led to his exile. Conrad was orphaned at a young age and subsequently raised by his uncle. At 17 he went to sea, an experience that shaped the bleak view of human nature which he expressed in his fiction. In such works as Lord Jim (1900), Youth (1902), and Nostromo (1904), Conrad depicts individuals thrust by circumstances beyond their control into moral and emotional dilemmas. His novel Heart of Darkness (1902), perhaps his best known and most influential work, narrates a literal journey to the center of the African jungle. This novel inspired the acclaimed motion picture Apocalypse Now. After the publication of his first novel, Almayer's Folly (1895), Conrad gave up the sea. He produced thirteen novels, two volumes of memoirs, and twenty-eight short stories. He died on August 3, 1924, in England.

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