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" That gentleness therefore, which belongs to virtue, is to be carefully distinguished from the mean spirit of cowards, and the fawning assent of sycophants. It renounces no just right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed... "
Letters on Clerical Manners and Habits: Addressed to a Student in the ... - Page 34
by Samuel Miller - 1852 - 376 pages
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The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 56

Books - 1777
...diftinguilhed from the mean fpirit of coward*, and the fawning affent of fycophants. It renounces no jaft right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed not only confident with a firm mind, but it necefifarily requires a manly fpirit, and a fixed principle, in...
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the monthly review or literary journal

SEVERAL HANDS - 1777
...diftinguifhe'd from the mean fpirit of cowards, and the fawning aflent of fycophants. It renounces no juft right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed not only confident with a firm mind, but it necefTarily requires a manly fpirit, and a fixed principle, in order...
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Sermons, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - Presbyterian Church - 1784
...diftinguiflied from the mean fpirit of cowards, and the fawning aflent of fycophants. It renounces no juft right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed not only confiftent with a firm mind, but it neceffarily requires a manly fpirir, and a fixed principle, in...
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Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical ..., Volume 2

Mr. Addison - Anecdotes - 1797 - 280 pages
...gentleness that belongs to virtue and which alone deserves the name, is therefore equally distinct from the mean spirit of cowards, and the fawning assent...important truth from flattery : it is, indeed, not only connected with a firm mind, but necessarily requires a manly spirit, and a fixed principle, in order...
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Sentimental Beauties from the Writings of Dr. Blair: Selected with a View to ...

Hugh Blair - Conduct of life - 1798 - 326 pages
...diftinguifhed from the mean fpirit of cowards, and the fawning aflent of fycophants.—It renounces no juft right from fear:— it gives up no important truth from flattery :—it is indeed not only confiftent with a firm mind, E 3 but but it neceflarily requires a manly fpirit and a fixed principle...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - English literature - 1799 - 356 pages
...diflinguiflied from the mean fpirit of cowards, and the fawning afsent of fycophants. It renounces no juft right from fear. It gives up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed not only confiftent with a firm mind, bu.t it necefsarily requires a manly fpirit, and a fixed principle, in...
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Sermons,

Hugh Blair, James Finlayson - Presbyterian Church - 1808
...occasions, even though we should stand alone. That gentleness, therefore, which belongs to virtue, is to be carefully distinguished from the mean spirit...up no important truth from flattery. It is indeed hot only consistent with a firm mind, but it necessarily requires a manly spirit, and a SERMON fixed...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - Electronic books - 1810 - 231 pages
...occasions, even though we should stand alone. That gentleness therefore. which belongs,,to virtue, is to be carefully distinguished from the mean spirit of, cowards, and die fawning assent of sycophants. It renounces no just right Trom ftfar. It give? Up HO iwrportant...
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The English Reader: Or Pieces in Prose and Poetry Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - Readers - 1812 - 356 pages
...various occasions, even though we should stand alone. That gentleness therefore which belongs to virtue, is to be carefully distinguished from the mean spirit...no important truth from flattery. It is indeed not onlyconsistent with a firm mind, but it necessarily requires a manly spirit, and a fixed principle,...
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Laura Valcheret

Laura Valcheret (fict. name.) - 1814
...occasions, even though we should stand alone: that gentleness, therefore, which belongs to virtue, is to be carefully distinguished from the mean spirit...fixed principle, in order to give it any real value : upon this solid ground only, the polish of gentleness can, with advantage, be superinduced.'' pisedand...
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