A Collection of the Occasional Papers for the Year ..., Volume 1

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J. Knapton, 1716
 

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Page 3 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 9 - For meat destroy not the work of God. All things indeed are pure ; but it is evil for that man who eateth with offence.
Page 16 - Scripture, can derive itself from the fountain, but may be plainly proved, either to have been brought in, in such an age after Christ, or that in such an age it was not in. In a word, there is no sufficient certainty but of Scripture only, for any considering man to build upon.
Page 16 - I, for my part, after a long, and (as I verily believe and hope) impartial search of the true way to eternal happiness, do profess plainly, that I cannot find any rest for the sole of my foot but upon this rock only. I...
Page 16 - Whatsoever else they believe besides it, and the plain, irrefragable, indubitable consequences of it, well may they hold it as a matter of opinion. But as matter of faith and religion, neither can they, with coherence to their own grounds, believe it themselves, nor require the belief of it of others, without most high and most schismatical presumption. I, for my part, after a long and (as I verily believe and hope) impartial search of the true way to eternal happiness...
Page 17 - Book, and require whether I believe it or no, and, seem it never so incomprehensible to human reason, I will subscribe it with hand and heart, as knowing no Demonstration can be stronger than this, God hath said so, therefore it is true.
Page 17 - ... man take mine from me. I will think no man the worse man, nor the worse Christian ; I will love no man the less for differing in opinion from me. And what measure I mete to others, I expect from them again. I am fully assured that God does not and therefore that...
Page 14 - That King James II., having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 15 - ... coronation ; such a king to whom the allegiance of an English subject is due ; and hath set up another kind of dominion ; which is to all intents an abdication or abandoning of his legal title as fully as if it had been done by express words.
Page 19 - ... to the choice of any other, whether (prince or subject, to prescribe to him what faith or worship he shall embrace. For no man can, if he would, conform his faith to the dictates of another.

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