Magazine of Natural History, Volume 9

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John Claudius Loudon, Edward Charlesworth, John Denson
Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1836 - Natural history
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Page 574 - The earth is utterly broken down, the earth is clean dissolved, the earth is moved exceedingly. The earth shall reel to and fro like a drunkard, and shall be removed like a cottage ; and the transgression thereof shall be heavy upon it ; and it shall fall and not rise again.
Page 397 - Nothing is foreign ; parts relate to whole ; One all-extending, all-preserving soul Connects each being, greatest with the least ; Made beast in aid of man, and man of beast ; All serv'd, all serving : nothing stands alone ; The chain holds on, and where it ends unknown.
Page 312 - This table and the accompanying remarks are the result of many years' actual observation ; the whole being constructed on a due consideration of the attraction of the sun and moon in their several positions respecting the earth ; and will, by simple inspection, show the observer what kind of weather will most probably follow the entrance of the moon into any of her quarters, and that so near the truth as to be seldom or never found to fail.
Page 198 - O Father ! Lord ! The All-beneficent! I bless thy name, That thou hast mantled the green earth with flowers. Linking our hearts to nature.
Page 445 - A NATURAL SYSTEM OF BOTANY; or, a Systematic View of the Organization, Natural Affinities, and Geographical Distribution of the whole Vegetable Kingdom : together with the Uses of the most important Species in Medicine, the Arts, &c.
Page 398 - They rise, they break, and to that sea return. Nothing is foreign ; parts relate to whole ; One all-extending, all-preserving Soul Connects each being, greatest with the least; Made beast in aid of man, and man of beast ; All served, all serving : nothing stands alone ; The chain holds on, and where it ends, unknown.
Page 50 - A MANUAL of BRITISH VERTEBRATE ANIMALS, Or, Descriptions of all the Animals belonging to the classes Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, and Pisces, which have been hitherto observed in the British Islands : including the domesticated, naturalized, and extirpated species : the whole systematically arranged. By the Rev. LEONARD JENYNS, MA Fellow of the Linnean, Zoological, and Entomological Societies of London ; and of the Cambridge Philosophical Society.
Page xvi - Nature, on a scale of a quarter of an inch to a foot, of all the trees of ten years...
Page 2 - ... that it actually came over in the same ship which conveyed the new dynasty to these shores. My father, who was of the first order of field naturalists, was always positive on this point ; and he maintained firmly, that it did accompany the House of Hanover in its emigration from Germany to England.
Page 397 - Look round our world; behold the chain of love Combining all below and all above. See plastic Nature working to this end, The single atoms each to other tend, Attract, attracted to, the next in place Form'd and impell'd its neighbour to embrace. See Matter next, with various life endued, Press to one centre still, the general good.

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