Hunt's Yachting Magazine, Volume 10

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Hunt, 1861 - Yachting
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Page 44 - Thames, owing to the velocities of the traveling wave varying with the depths of the water, the Author described the best means of observing the wave on rivers and other like places, and then proceeded to the application of some of the principles before laid down to practice. First, he said it was a delightful circumstance that the wave principle did not meddle at all with the form of a ship's midship section, but left the conductor entirely free to adopt any form of section he pleased. Next, it...
Page 113 - Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms. For the Lord is a great God, and a great King above all gods. In his hand are the deep places of the earth: the strength of the hills is his also. The sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land.
Page 344 - ... three-fifths of the breadth, the remainder shall be esteemed the just length of the keel to find the tonnage ; and the breadth shall be taken from the outside of the outside plank in the broadest place in the ship, be it either above or below the main wales, exclusive of all manner of doubling planks that may be wrought upon the sides of the ship...
Page 344 - Race shall be ascertained in the manner following : the length shall be taken in a straight line at the deck, from the fore-part of the stem, to the after-part of the sternpost ; from which deducting the breadth, the remainder shall be esteemed the...
Page 217 - Tromsöe had been upset two or three days before in our immediate vicinity, and one of the crew killed by a walrus. It seemed that the walrus, a large old bull, charged the boat, and the harpooner as usual received him with his lance full in the chest, but the shaft of the lance broke all to shivers, and the walrus, getting inside of it, threw himself on the gunwale of the boat and overset it in an instant While the men were floundering in the water amongst their oars and tackle, the infuriated animal...
Page 195 - ... successive zones of wood, which indicate the periods of growth. The inclosure of zone within zone is owing to the mode in which the wood is produced, and the position in which it is deposited. Wood is formed by the leaves during the growing season, and passes down towards the root between the bark and the wood of...
Page 44 - ... miles an hour which the power to be put into her could be expected to give; 120 feet of parallel body were therefore put into her amidships. The great ship might be of less fine-lines and still go with the same velocity. There was a very valuable conclusion for practical ship-builders to be drawn, independently of what had been stated about the lines.
Page 44 - Scotland, where the carrier wave traveled only seven miles an hour, he had compelled a boat to go ten •miles, and he found that the water not only rose up, but lifted the boat •with it, so that she drew less water than before, and actually went easier at ten miles an hour than at five. Had not railways come into fashion just at the time, the country would have been covered with little troughs, and people would have been riding on the tops of these •waves in an easier and cheaper mode than by...
Page 43 - ... first thought that the stern of a vessel ought to be of the same form as the bow; but thought it proper to undertake a series of experiments, with the view of ascertaining what happened when a hole in the water had to be filled up. Where did the water that filled it come from? and how did it come? He first found that the hollow made in the water had no tendency to travel with an independent velocity of its own, but moved just as fast, and only as fast, as the body which produced it. He then discovered...
Page 421 - Lastly, the mode of confining the oar to the gunwale of the boat is of much consequence. The most common modes, in ordinary boats, are rowlocks and double pins, between which the oar works, but as an oar is liable to jamb in the rowlock or between the pins, when rowing in a rough sea, and thereby to get broken, or to damage the gunwale, the oars of life-boats have generally been worked in a rope grummet or ring, over a single iron thowl-pin ; a further advantage of this plan being that it enables...

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