The History of the Gunpowder Plot: With Several Historical Circumstances Prior to that Event, Connecting the Plots of the Roman Catholics to Re-establish Popery in this Kingdom

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Vernor and Hood, 1804 - Gunpowder Plot, 1605 - 90 pages

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Page 48 - I say, they will receive a terrible blow this parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them. This counsel is not to be contemned, because it may do you good, and can do you no harm : For the danger is past, as soon as you have burned the letter. *And I hope God will give you the grace to make good use of it, unto whese holy protection I commend you...
Page 48 - I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament. For God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time. And think not slightly of this advertisement ; but retire yourself into your country, where you may expect the event in safety. For, though there be no appearance of any stir, yet I say, they will receive a terrible blow this parliament ; and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Page 48 - My Lord, — Out of the love I bear to some of your friends, I have a care of your preservation. Therefore I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament For God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time.
Page 48 - A terrible blow, and yet the authors concealed; a danger so sudden, and yet so great ; these circumstances seemed all to denote some contrivance by gunpowder ; and it was thought advisable to inspect all the vaults below the Houses of Parliament. This care belonged to the Earl of Suffolk, lord chamberlain, who purposely delayed the search till the day before the meeting of Parliament. He remarked those great piles of wood and...
Page 50 - CATESBY'S character had entitled him to such regard, that ROOKWOOD and DIGBY were seduced by their implicit trust in his judgment; and they declared) that from the motive alone of friendship to him, they were ready, on any occasion, to have sacrificed their lives.
Page 54 - Many holy men, he said, and our ancestors among the rest, had been seduced to concur with that church in her scholastic doctrines ; who yet had never admitted her seditious principles, concerning the Pope's power of dethroning Kings, or sanctifying assassination. The wrath of Heaven is denounced against crimes, but innocent error may obtain its favour ; and...
Page 47 - Piercy should seize him, or assassinate him. The princess Elizabeth, a child likewise, was kept at Lord Harrington's house in Warwickshire ; and Sir Everard Digby...
Page 76 - You shall swear by the blessed Trinity, and by the sacrament you now propose to receive, never to disclose directly or indirectly, by word or circumstance, the matter that shall be proposed to you to keep secret, nor desist from the execution thereof until the rest shall give you leave.
Page 47 - Grant, being let into the conspiracy, engaged to assemble their friends on pretence of a hunting match, and seizing that princess, immediately to proclaim her queen. So transported were they with rage against their adversaries, and so charmed with the prospect of revenge, that they forgot all care of their own safety; and trusting to the general confusion which...
Page 45 - All this passed in the spring and summer of the year 1604; when the conspirators also hired a house in Piercy's name, adjoining to that in which the Parliament was to assemble. Towards the end of that year, they began their operations. That they might be less...

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