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Mr. Secretary Orde deprecates the idea of a popish conspiracy

Mr. Curran's speech, Note

150

Mr. Forbes brings in his pension bill—The bill is opposed by

the chancellor of the exchequer, Mr. Monk Mason, &c. 151

The bill lost upon a division, 129 against 65—Mr. Grattan

brings forward the subject of tithes—T'he various oppressive

modes and objects of tithes

152

Mr. Secretary Orde differs in opinion from Mr. Grattan 155

Mr. Griffith opposes the third reading of the bill for the better

preservation of the peace, &c.

.157

Sir Edward Crofton and Mr. Conolly join the last speaker 158

The bill committed by a large majority-Mr. Brown moves for

an authentic list of the number of Roman Catholics who had

testified their allegiance

158

Mr. Charles O'Neile opposes it as useless--Mr. Griffith vouch-

es for the allegiance of the body of the Catholics-Report of

the committee of the British commons upon the treaty of

commerce with France

159

Mr. Flood's observations upon the effect of the treaty upon

Ireland

160

Mr. Grenville animadverts upon the conduct of the parliament

of Ireland-Mr. Flood's reply

161

Mr. Grenville explains

163

The Marquis of Lansdowne in the British House of Lords

shews his warm attachment to the interests of Ireland 164

The Duke of Rutland dies in October 1787--His character and

administration

165

Influence of the English cabinet delineated by Lord Clare 166

A sketch of Lord Clare's public and private character 167

The citizens of Dublin petition the provost and fellows of Tri-

nity College, Dublin, for and obtain a gratuitous education

for the son of the patriot, Dr. Lucas

168

The Marquis of Buckingham meets parliament-Mr. Parsons

opposes the address

169

The address voted unanimously

170

The secretary moves from the throne for the security of the

Established Church

171

Mr. Forbes's motion for a list of pensions since the last session

of parliament carried-Mr. Curran's parliamentary indepen-

dence, Note

172

Mr. Forbes's statement of certain pensions-Fails in his at-

tempt to bring in a pension bill

173

Mr. Conolly supports Mr. Forbes--The secretary opposes on

the score of its being an attack on the prerogative 173

The inhabitants of Dublin present a petition signed by 7000 in-

dividuals, paying taxes, against ths police bill-Mr. Forbes

moves an address to the crown

174

An account of the increase of the pension list

175

Mr. Monk Mason and the chancellor oppose the address, and

get rid of the question by adjournment

176

Mr. Conolly moves to repeal the hearth tax

178

Is opposed by the treasury bench

179

Mr. Conolly in reply states the origin of the tax, the miseries

of the poor, &c.

180

The speaker's speech to the lord lieutenant upon presenting the

182

Mr. Grattan's resolutions concerning tithes

182

Parliament prorogued-A plan for surrounding the Island with

guard houses to prevent smuggling

183

Mr. Corry appointed surveyor of the ordnance-His laudable

conduct in office

184

The county of Armagh disturbed with the Peep of Day Boys

and Defenders-They distinguish themselves at first by the

names of Fleets, of Bawn Fleet, and Nappagh Fleet, from the

names of their villages-An account of the rise and progress

of these rioters—The rioters at length form religious parties

185

Volunteers mustered to quell the rioters-They join the Pro-

testant party

186

Baron Hamilton quashes the indictments against some defenders

-Parliament prorogued

187

The king's visit to Cheltenham and illness

188

The king's disorder turned into a delirium-The parliament

assembled 20th November, 1788-The chancellor in the lords

and Mr. Pitt in the British commons shew the cause of their

assembling without the usual notice

189

Likewise the necessity of supplying the defect occasioned by

the absence of the king-Council at Whitehall—The king's

physicians sworn-The president of the privy council informs

both houses that the king was incapable of meeting his par-

liament

190

Mr. Pitt moves the appointment of a committee of 21 mem-

bers to examine the king's physicians--Mr. Fox opposes
Mr. Pitt's motion of searching for precedents in cases of the
suspension by infirmity of the royal authority, as nugatory,

by reason that the heir apparent could exercise the functions

of the executive, and that it was his inherent right 191

Mr. Pitt contends, that during the sovereign's natural life the

heir apparent is no more entitled to the regency than any

other subject-Lord Loughborough’s opinion on the subject

193

The majority in both British houses against the claim of the

prince

194

Mr. Pitt's resolutions moved in a committee of the commons

195

Mr. Pitt's letter to the Prince of Wales

195

The Prince's answer to the premier’s letter

197

Upon Mr. Loveden's motion, a new committee appointed to

report upon the king's health

200

Restrictions upon the prince's authority in quality of regent 201

The resolutions containing these restrictions opposed in the

lords and protested against

203

Names of 55 lords and two princes of the blood that protested

204

The two committees wait upon the prince with the resolutions-

The prince's answer-The queen's answer

206

The resolutions ordered to be entered upon the journals-Lord

Camden's motion for letters patent under the great seal 207

Lord Portchester opposes the motion

208

The resolutions amended by the lords, sent and passed in the

commons after warm debates Mr. Burke supports the ex-

clusive right of the prince-Lord Bathurst's (in the absence

of the chancellor) speech in the House of Lords, purporting

the necessity of a commission under the great seal on account

of the king's illness

209

Mr. Pitt moves for a bill to provide for the care of his majes-

ty's person-Unpopularity of the Marquis of Buckingham in

Ireland

210

Associations in Ireland propose a test to their members-Con-

ditions of the said test-Instructions for the regency sent

from the English cabinet to the castle of Dublin

211

The Irish parliament convened 5th February, 1789 212

Opposition to the Marquis of Buckinghani's administration-

The lord lieutenant's speech

213

Mr. Grattan's speech upon the Buckingham adıninistration 214

A sketch of the Irish character in general

215

Sir John Blaquiere's invectives against the viceroy, Note

216

Mr. Fitzherbert moves for a committee of the whole house on

the 16th, to consider of the state of the nation for the purpose

of obtaining time-Mr. Grattan proposes an amendment, that

the house do meet next Wednesday; the amendment adopt-

ed by a majority of 54— The regency business debated, Mr.

Fitzgibbon and Mr. Graftan the leading speakers 218

Mr. Grattan's opinion, that the only mode of supplying the de-

ficiency of the king or third estate, was by address-Speech

thereon

219

Mr. Grattan supports his opinion by referring to the address

voted by the convention parliament to the Prince of Orange

and the precedents of the revolution

221

Messrs. Grattan, Conolly, and G. Ponsonby, move resolutions

for granting the regency, during the king's illness, to the heir

apparent

The attorney general in an elaborate speech opposes the resolu-

tions—The secretary of state adheres to the mode of address

223

The resolutions, after a violent debate, carried

224

The House of Lords meet, the Earl of Charlemont moves for
an address to the Prince of Wales-Carried-The address

228

The message from the lords received by the commons—The

house concurs with the address_Both houses wait upon the

lord lieutenant with the address to be transmitted to the prince,

which his excellency refuses to transmit

229

Mr. Graitan moves, that a certain number of members be ap-

pointed to take the address to the prince-Names of the de..

puties

230

Mr. Monk Mason reports from the committee of supply 231

Mr. Grattan's speech upon a short money bill, Note 232

The Irish committee of both houses present their address to

the prince

233

The prince's answer

233

A reform of the police bill moved by Mr. Grattan-As also a

bill to prevent granting the offices of state to absentees

234

Mr. Grattan's observations upon the reversionary patent grant-

ed to Thomas Grenville

236

Resolution moved by Mr. Grattan for preventing such grants-

Mr. Parsons opposes the resolution-Mr. Grattan's speech

-Freeman's Journal, character of Higgins the proprietor 237

Mr. Orde's pension of 17001. per annum-Mr. Grattan's bill

for securing the freedom of election opposed by Mr. Beres-

ford

238

Mr. George Ponsonby challenges the treasury to declare whether

he were a solicitor for any government favour--The attorney

general opposes the bill-Mr. Secretary Fitzherbert answers

the attorney general's speech upon the pension list 239

The lord lieutenant's speech to both houses, 14th March, 1789

244

The commons on the motion of Mr. Grattan address the king

245

The address of the commons to the Prince of Wales 246

Mr. Hobart appointed to succeed Mr. Fitzherbert-The king's

answer to the address of the commons

247

The
message from the lord lieutenant-Mr. Grattan's bill for

-Ti dom of election of members to serve in par-

liament-Rejucted

248

Sir Henry Cavendish reports from the committee upon the po-

lice bill—the resolutions of the committee rejected 249

Mr. Grattan's speech and plan for tithes-Marquis of Bucking,

ham's unpopular administration

250

The establishment of a Whig Club in Dublin-Characters of

this club by Lord Clare and Mr. Grattan

251

Public thanksgiving for the king's recovery-Napper Tandy's

victory over the castle in the election of Alderman Howison

to the dignity of mayor-A solemn high mass for the king's

recovery

252

The Marquis of Buckingham secretly quits Ireland June 1789

-New disturbances in Munster-Lord Fitzgibbon and Mr.

Foster sworn lords justices—The Peep of Day Boys and De-

fenders

253

The formula of the Defenders oath and rules of the society 254

A spirit of liberty excited in Ireland from the example of

American independence

255

Marquis of Buckingham is succeeded by Lord Westmorland 256

A list of pensions granted by the Buckingham administration 257

Mr. Grattan's speech upon the address

259

Mr. Grattan's speech and motion for a resolution arraigning the

late administration Seconded by Mr. Conolly-Opposed by

Sir Hercules Langrishe and Mr. Beresford

261

The resolution rejected after a violent debate - Mr. Curran's

motion for an address to his majesty lost

262

Mr. Forbes reports on the increase of the pension list- The

king's answer to the address of the commons, note 263

The opposition encreases

265

Observation on Mr. Grattan's political character-A remarka-

ble speech of Mr. O'Neil during the debate on the pension

list, note

266

Mr. George Ponsonby's motion

268

Mr. Grattan's unexpected speech, with a motion for a select

committee to impeach the ministry for mal-practices, &c. 269

The motion lost by 144 against 88-Debates upon the police

bill

273

Mr. Forbes moves for the second reading of the place bill-

Motion lost by 143 against 96

274

Magee, the printer, confined upon different fiats of the Lord

Chief Justice of the King's Bench-George Ponsonby's mo-

tion upon the illegality of fiats lost by 125 against 91 -Grat-

tan's speech upon the impeachment of, &c.— The responsibili-

ty and pension bilis lost

275

Mr. Curran's speech, followed by a motion for an address to

his majesty for redress of grievances

276.

The motion lost by 141 against 90

276

Parliament prorogued

277

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