The St. James's Magazine and United Empire Review, Volume 36

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A.H. Moxon, 1879
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Page 43 - tis a common proof, That lowliness is young ambition's ladder, Whereto the climber upward turns his face; But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder turns his back, Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees By which he did ascend.
Page 299 - The western wind was wild and dank with foam, And all alone went she. The western tide crept up along the sand, And o'er and o'er the sand, And round and round the sand, As far as eye could see. The rolling mist came down and hid the land : And never home came she.
Page 303 - Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever ; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long : And so make life, death, and that vast for-ever One grand, sweet song.
Page 49 - The heights by great men reached and kept Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept. Were toiling upward in the night.
Page 115 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver-sounding instruments did meet With the base murmur of the waters' fall ; The waters' fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call; The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Page 115 - And all about old stocks and stubs of trees, Whereon nor fruit nor leaf was ever seen, Did hang upon the ragged rocky knees ; On which had many wretches hanged been, Whose carcases were scattered on the green, And thrown about the cliffs.
Page 301 - Out of all the seas: But the black North-easter, Through the snowstorm hurled, Drives our English hearts of oak Seaward round the world. Come, as came our fathers...
Page 49 - We have not wings, we cannot soar; But we have feet to scale and climb By slow degrees, by more and more, The cloudy summits of our time. The mighty pyramids of stone That wedge-like cleave the desert airs, When nearer seen, and better known, Are but gigantic flights of stairs.
Page 115 - Disordred hong about his shoulders round, And hid his face ; through which his hollow eyne Lookt deadly dull, and stared as astound ; His raw-bone cheekes, through penurie and pine, Were shronke into his jawes, as he did never dine.
Page 299 - Dee." They rowed her in across the rolling foam, The cruel crawling foam, The cruel hungry foam, To her grave beside the sea: But still the boatmen hear her call the cattle home Across the sands of Dee.

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