The Roots of American Bureaucracy, 1830-1900

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Beard Books, 2006 - Political Science - 236 pages
This innovative book argues that the mugwump reformers who built early bureaucracies cared less about enhancing government efficiency than about restraining the power of majoritarian political leaders in Congress and the executive branch.

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Contents

The Emergence of the Majoritarian Authority Structure
9
The Antislavery Movement and Moralistic Objections to Majoritarian Democracy
41
The Triumph and Failure of Antislavery and the Transformation of Federalism
62
The Quest for a Scientific Morality
82
Building Bureaucratic Authority Structures
113
The Unresolved Tensions
156
Notes
163
Index
203
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Page 25 - In a political point of view this department is chiefly important as affording the means of diffusing knowledge. It is to the body politic what the veins and arteries are to the natural — conveying rapidly and regularly to the remotest parts of the system, correct information of the operations of the government ; and bringing back to* it the wishes and feelings of the people. Through its agency, we have secured to ourselves the full enjoyment of the blessings of a free press.

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