Documentary History of Reconstruction: Political, Military, Social, Religious, Educational & Industrial, 1865 to the Present Time, Volume 2

Front Cover
Walter Lynwood Fleming
A.H. Clark Company, 1907 - Reconstruction
Narrative of Bering's second expedition, 1733-1743, by an expedition member.
 

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Contents

73
41
Frauds taxation and expenditure
59
1 The refreshment room 2 The State must take care of its statesmen 3 Supplies for South Carolina
61
4 Some legislative expenses
65
5 Public printing in South Carolina
68
6 The finances of Arkansas
69
7 Taxation in North Carolina
70
8 Taxation in Mississippi 9 County finances
71
The Reconstruction militia 1 Martial law in Arkansas 2 The white militia in Arkansas
73
3 Negro militia in Arkansas
76
4 An experience with Governor Holdens militia
78
5 The militia in South Carolina elections
79
Political methods of Reconstruction 1 Negro voting system 2 Registration and election laws
81
3 Bacon and hams in politics
83
4 Voting early and often
85
5 A Little Joker 6 The ghost of the Confederacy
86
7 Why Adam Kirk was a Democrat 8 Fear of spells and charms
87
9 Negro Democrats in South Carolina
88
10 Political intimidation
89
11 Why the Whigs became Democrats
91
State and national politics 1 President Grant and Mississippi politics
93
2 Division among the Arkansas Republicans 3 Reform Republicans in Arkansas
96
4 Anything to defeat Grant 5 Liberal Republican demands
97
6 Republican platform 1872
98
8 Democratic views on the Southern Question 1876
99
9 The Republican standpoint in 1876
100
Federal control in state affairs 1 First Enforcement
102
2 Second Enforcement
112
3 Ku Klux
123
4 Wirit of habeas corpus suspended in South Carolina
128
5 The election of a Senator
131
6 The attorney general and the Alabama legislature
133
7 Use of troops and deputy marshals
135
8 Federal interference under the Enforcement Laws
138
Louisiana and Arkansas 1 Division among the Louisiana Radicals
141
2 AntiWarmoth handbill 3 The usurpation of 1872
142
8 Appeal to the President
147
9 The revolution fails
151
10 Conditions after the revolution
152
11 An army officers report on conditions in Louisiana
153
12 Legislature broken up by troops
156
13 Sheridans Banditti telegram 14 The Wheeler adjustment
157
15 Two governors in Arkansas
160
16 The riot in Arkansas 17 Presidents proclamation on Arkansas
161
EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF RECONSTRUCTION Introduction The Editor
161
References
169
Section 1 Northern views of the educational problems of Reconstruction 1 Education as an element in Reconstruction
171
2 The negros capacity for education
174
3 Northern songs in Southern schools
175
Attitude of the Southern whites toward negro education 1 An appeal from the freedmen
176
2 Shall the negro be educated
177
3 Why the negroes should be educated
178
4 The Southern churches and negro education
180
5 Southern whites should teach negroes
181
Northern aid to negro education 1 The desire of the blacks for education 2 Bureau schools in North Carolina
182
3 A Northern teacher and a Southern editor
183
A foreigners observations
184
5 Value of the missionary work
186
Mixed schools 1 A debate on mixed schools
187
2 Constitutional provisions for mixed schools
189
3 The deaf dumb and blind
190
4 The reconstruction of South Carolina University
191
5 Results of the mixed school policy
194
Education during Reconstruction 1 A Democratic school for negroes
196
2 School appropriations in South Carolina
197
3 Trials of a negro teacher
198
8 Educational conditions in Mississippi
204
9 A lesson in a Florida school
205
10 The White League after a teacher
206
11 Desire for education fast waning
207
12 The mistakes of the Reconstruction education
208
13 Armstrongs plans for negro education
209
CHAPTER X RECONSTRUCTION IN THE CHURCHES
215
Introduction The Editor References
218
Military regulation of churches 221 1 Northern churches in control of Southern churches
219
2 Military regulation of church services
222
3 Closing the Episcopal churches
223
4 A pugnacious Methodist preacher
228
Division or reunion 229 1 Feeling in the Southern church
229
2 The Church situation in Virginia
230
3 Position of the Methodists in regard to reunion
233
4 Northern ministers driven
235
5 Border churches go with the South
236
Organizing Northern churches in the South
238
2 Reconstruction of Church and State
240
3 Disintegration and Absorption
243
The Southern white churches and the negroes
245
2 Organizing a negro church
247
3 Negro missions of the Southern Baptists 4 Negroes need religious instruction
248
5 The Southern Methodists and the negroes
250
Work of the Northern churches among the negroes 252 1 Why the Northern churches went south
252
2 The American Missionary Association
254
3 Working upon the colored population
255
4 Mistreatment of Northern missionaries 5 A prophecy
256
6 Discouragement
257
Conditions in the negro churches 259 1 A negro preacher whipped 2 Jealousy in negro churches
259
3 A persecuted negro church
260
4 The negro Episcopalians
261
SOCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS DURING RECONSTRUCTION
263
Introduction The Editor
265
References
268
Section 1 The whites during Reconstruction 1 A state of mind 2 The mountain whites
269
3 Fear of negro insurrection
270
Alarm among the whites
271
5 Thad Stevens is dead 6 Social ostracism of Republicans
272
7 Social conditions in 1875
273
3 Intermarriage of races in Georgia
288
4 Marrying a nigger school marm
289
5 A mixed marriage at Port Gibson
291
6 Sumners views on equality
292
7 A Southern definition of equal rights
293
8 Political effects of civil rights agitation
294
9 Civil Rights Act 1875
295
Attempts at industrial reorganization 1 A plan of industrial reorganization
298
2 To encourage immigration
299
3 The effects of emancipation 4 Beginning with free negro labor
300
5 Making contracts with negroes
304
6 The first pay day on a plantation
305
7 The land question in Virginia
307
Conditions in the Black Belt and in the white districts 1 Enjoying freedom to its fullest extent 2 Conditions in 1870
309
3 Negro opposition to immigration
310
4 The emancipation of white labor
311
5 An Englishmans estimate of free negro labor
312
6 Cities and varied industries 298
315
8 The credit system
317
9 The deadfall evil
318
10 A Northern estimate of negro industry
320
11 Conditions in 1876
321
12 Cotton production by whites and blacks
323
CHAPTER XII The Ku Klux MOVEMENT Introduction The Editor References Section 1 Causes of the Ku Klux movement 1 Conditions in Alabama
331
2 Why the Klan was formed in North Carolina
333
3 Dissatisfaction in South Carolina
335
4 An Englishmans statement of the causes
336
5 Stealing and race prejudice
337
6 Desire to get rid of the negro
338
7 A Scalawags opinion of the causes
339
8 Violation of the Appomattox Programme
340
9 General Forrests explanations
342
10 The Whites must and shall rule
344
The declarations of the secret orders 1 Organization and principles of the Ku Klux Klan
347
2 The Knights of the White Camelia
349
Initiation oath of the White Brotherhood
354
The 76 Association 5 The Council of Safety
355
6 Young Mens Democratic Club
356
7 A defensive organization
357
8 The White League
358
The methods and work of the secret orders 1 Regulators Jayhawkers Blackhorse Cavalry 2 The transformation of the Klan
360
Ku Klux costume
364
4 Spreading news of the Klan
365
5 A Ku Klux order
366
6 A Ku Klux parade
367
7 Influence in the elections
370
8 Negro officials ordered to resign 9 Ku Klux discipline
371
10 A decent man is safer
374
The Klans outlawed 1 AntiKuKlux statute
375
2 Martial law in Tennessee
376
187
385
Section 1 Conditions in 1874
387
2 Pike County Platform
388
3 Conservatives use Radical methods
389
Whipping Independents into line
390
5 Revolution in Arkansas
392
Section 2
394
2 Colorline in politics
395
3 The Black Colorline
396
Spirit of the Mississippi press
399
5 Position of a Southern white Republican
401
6 Why the Republicans lost Mississippi
402
Section 3
403
1 A Horrible Disaster 2 How to escape Moses and Whipper
405
3 The Presidents attitude
406
Rifle clubs and artillery companies
407
What is true and what is not true
409
6 Hamptons speech to the blacks
411
7 A man who will do what he promises
412
8 Democratic working
413
9 A White Mans Government or Military Rule
414
The downfall of the Reconstruction régime 1 End of carpetbag rule in Florida
415
2 Troops withdrawn from Louisiana
417
3 Troops withdrawn from South Carolina
420
4 The Presidents Southern policy
421
1 The purpose of the Fourteenth Amendment
423
2 The scope of the Fourteenth Amendment
424
3 First Enforcement Act unconstitutional
425
4 Ku Klux Act unconstitutional
426
5 Civil Rights Act unconstitutional
428
Legislative undoing of Reconstruction 1 Amnesty Act of 1872
431
4 Federal election laws repealed 5 Disabilities removed
432
Results and later conditions 1 The negros heritage from the carpetbaggers 2 A hole in the ballotbox
433
3 Citizenship made the Negro a Man
434
4 Negro and white artisans
435
5 The abodes of the blacks in cities
436
6 Agriculture 18601893
437
7 Industrial decay of the Black Belt
439
Section 5
441
9 Morals after twenty years
442
10 Coming out of Egypt 11 Criminal negroes
443
12 Societies among the blacks
444
13 Hostility of the low whites 14 The only trouble now
445
15 Jim Crow cars
446
16 Superstition among the blacks
447
17 The negro churches
448
Limitation of the suffrage 1 Mississippi suffrage plan
450
2 South Carolina suffrage plan 3 The Grandfather plan
451
4 Old Soldier and Grandfather plans
453
309
459
93
460
Section 7
461
375
463
196
465
THE UNDOING OF RECONSTRUCTION 381 Introduction The Editor References 385
478
459

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Page 285 - That all persons within the jurisdiction of the United States shall be entitled to the full and equal enjoyment of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of inns, public conveyances on land or water, theaters, and other places of public amusement ; subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law, and applicable alike to citizens of every race and color, regardless of any previous condition of servitude.
Page 411 - In this connection it is proper to state that civil rights, such as are guaranteed by the Constitution against state aggression, cannot be impaired by the wrongful acts of individuals, unsupported by state authority in the shape of laws, customs, or judicial or executive proceedings. The wrongful act of an individual, unsupported by any such authority, is simply a private wrong, or a crime of that individual; an invasion of the rights of the injured party, it is true, whether they affect his person,...
Page 106 - ... and to the full and equal benefit of all laws and proceedings for the security of person and property, as is enjoyed by white citizens...
Page 98 - Republican party stands sacredly pledged. The power to provide for the enforcement of the principles embodied in the recent constitutional amendments is vested by those amendments in the Congress of the United...
Page 124 - Constitution and secured by the laws for the protection of such rights, privileges, or immunities, and the constituted authorities of such State are unable to protect, or, from any cause, fail In or refuse protection of the people in such rights, such facts shall be deemed a denial by such State of the equal protection of the laws to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the United States...
Page 406 - We doubt very much whether any action of a State not directed by way of discrimination against the negroes as a class, or an account of their race, will ever be held to come within the purview of this provision.
Page 410 - It is State action of a particular character that is prohibited. Individual invasion of individual rights is not the subject-matter of the amendment.
Page 221 - District whence he escaped ; and the better to enable the said Commissioners, when thus appointed, to execute their duties faithfully and efficiently, in conformity with the requirements of the Constitution of the United States, and...
Page 219 - Most heartily we beseech thee, with thy favour to behold and bless thy servant The President of the United States, and all others in authority; and so replenish them with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that they may always incline to thy will, and walk in thy way. Endue them plenteously with heavenly gifts; grant them in health and prosperity long to live; and finally, after this life, to attain everlasting joy and felicity; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
Page 431 - The affinity between them is so close that it is difficult to tell where one begins and the other ends.

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