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Ossian's Poems

1 | Verger of St. Patrick's

111

The Anonmyous Letter

2 | Poetry-My Own Dear Isle

112

Civil Engineers

4 Temperature of the Earth

113

Music

5 The Ballad Singer of Limerick-(Con. 132) 1:14

America

6 | Poetry-Care

118

The Mint

8 First Invasion of Ireland

119

A Sailor's Shot-(Continued 42)

9 Poetry—Christmas Time

120

Romance of real Life

12 ! A Day on the Shannon

121

Fish

13 | Poetry--Serenade

123

Poetry-Morn

13 The British Peeress

125

Destruction of Wolves

15 | Poetry— The Student's Dream

127

Poetry-Life

15 Reminiscenses of a Barrister_The Real Heir

129

Farm Produce in Ireland

16 | Poetry_The Old Raven

131

Life and its Varieties- The Tradesman's Child 17 The Ballad Singer of Limerick-(Continued 146) 132
The Old World
25 Poetry-Inchiquin—(Continued 152)

136
Grace Darling
26 Irish Beggars

138
New Coats
27 Printing in the Georgian

142
Chinese War
28 The Lapse of Time

144
Old Songs
29 Topographical Societies

145

Poetry-Lough Bray

30 The Ballad Singer of Limerick-(Continued 163) 146

Petersburgh
31 Poetry_The Mermaid's Invitation

149

Fruit Trees

32 The Young Physician—(Continued 170) 150

National Testimonial

33 Poetry—Inchiquin—(Concluded)

152

Sketch from Real Life

34 | The Young Lover's Tale

154

Irish Legends-- The Phooca

36 The Fortunate Lieutenant

156

Aerial Steam Carriage

39 | Dean Swift

158

Poetry – The Last Hope of the Exile

39 Poetry-An Anglo Irish Tale

158

Revival of Irish Music

40 | Irish Mines and Colleries

160

King John

41 | Religion of the Anciet Persians

161

A Sailor's Shot_(Concluded)

42 The late Rev. Charles Wolf

162

Adulteration of Milk

48 Poetry- The Nativity

162

Life and its Varieties—The Emigrant

49 The Ballad Singer of Limerick-(Continued 179) 163

Poetry-Song to a Songstress

51 | National Music of Ireland

168

The Heart_Circulation of the Blood

52 Poetry—The Disenthralled Spirit

168

The Beggar-A Fragment

52

-The Past Year

168

Steel

53 Carbonic Acid

169

The Old Gentleman in the Snuff Coloured Coat 54 The Young Physician-(Concluded)

170

Poetry-Adieu

55 Dean Swift

173

Reason and Instinct

56 Poetry- A Fragment

174

Ossian's Poems-Morna-(Continued. 82) 57 The Irish Emigrant's Farewell

175

Poetry-Donegal Castle

58 The Man of the World

176

Canadian Voyageurs

59 A Day at Glancullen

177

Burlesquing the Irish

60 The Ballad Singer of Limerick_(Concluded) 179

Anglo Saxon Romances

61 Poetry-Opening of the Sixth Seal

182

Machinery

63 Irish Round Towers

183

Poetry_Winter's Night

64 Poetry-Carrickdroid Castle

184

Literary Men

65

-Faith

185

The Suicide

66 | Annadown on the Lake

186

Poetry- The Garden of Life

70 Bonaparte

189

Humble Origin of Celebrated Men

71

Evils of Intemperance

Irish Legends, The Bashee
72 The Still Hunter-(Continued 211)

193

Poetry - Song

of the Captive Chief

73 Variety of Creation

199

The Shuler's Tale

74 | Poetry-Lines on an Ancient Irish MS.

200

Puetry- The Dead Bell

76 Journal of a Private Soldier–Harry D.

202

Maxims

77 | Poetry— The West

204

Temperance

78 An Evening's Adventure

206

Coral

79 | Poetry-A Fragment

208

Poetry-Love

80 | Thermography

209

Irish History

81 | Poetry-Ages of Love

210

Ossian's Poems-Morna (Concluded)

82 | The Still Hunter-(Concluded)

211

Story of Hollantide

83 The Lost Son

218

Nautical Recollections

86 “ The Agint"

220

Poetry—The Warrior's Return

89 | Poetry-Lament of the Lark

222

Lough Corrib

90 The Young Baronet

225

Reproduction of Atmospheric Air

92 | Poetry—To Eliza

227

Drainage of Land

93 Notes on Australia

228

Gaming

94 | The Soldier and his Bride

230

The Human Body
95 Poetry-Strongbow-(Continued 248)

232

Dew and Frost

96 The Vow

233

Reminiscenses of a Barrister-Murder Will Out 97 Poetry-Lines written in Duleek Churchyard 235
The Ballad Singer of Limerick (Continued 114) 102 Circulation of the Blood

236

Poetry--Battle of Knockthu

104 Poetry-To Kate

237

'The Courtship

106 Ernesta Di Castellani

238

109 Australian Colonies

241

Poetry – The Eagle's Song

109 Poetry-Life

242

The Still

110 | Chronicles of Sienna-(Continued 263)

243

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190

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Poetry-Strongbow-(Concluded)

248 | Irish Minstrelsy

354

A Farewell

253 Poetry- To the Poppy

354

Gratitude

254 News and Newspapers

355

Poetry--Green Fields of Erin

255 Benjamin Block's Log-(Concluded)

358

Round Towers

257 | Hardware Artizans of England

361

Sulphur

260 Water Power of Ireland

362

Poetry_The Adieu

261 | Periods of Human Life

362

Chronicles of Sienna_(Continued 290)

262 The Unamiable

363

What Life to Choose

265 Poetry-Imitation of Spencer's Faerie Queene 363

Lord Byron

266 Irish Legend-Killahookawn Stone

364

Sensations

267 Foetry-To Maria

366

Maid of Liscanner

268 Mammoth Cave at Kentucky

367

Vegetable Kingdom

269 The Post-Office

368

Wonders of Creation

270 | Interesting Adventure

308

Heat and Light

271 | Poetry- The Rest of the Brave

370

Poetry-King Williamstown

272 The Wake

371

A Tale of Durrow Abbey ...

273 Aerial Steam Carriage

375

Poetry—Moonlight Musings

278 | Homeless Son-(Continned 389)

376

Shakspeare

279 Jerusalem— The Sorrowfal Way

377

Freemasonry

279 Scraps from Irish History-1782

378

Theory of Thunder and Lightning

280 Tyre – The Heralds

380

Has the Moon an Atmosphere?

280 Poetry- The Universe

391

Poetry—Three Scenes from the Life of Jacob 281

A Dream

382

Ugly Women

281

From the German

383

The Unfortunate Lovers

282 Maquarie Harbour

384

War in India

286 Poetry- A Stranger's Address to Ireland 386

Poetry—Fancy Ball at the Rotundo

287 Water Power of Ireland

387

Plurality of Worlds

289 | Poetry-God is Love

383

Chronicles of Sienna-(Continued 318)

290 | Impure Air-Crowded Assemblies

383

Poetry-On Julia

292 Homeless Son-(Continued 408)

389

The Arts

292 | Poetry-On Age

391

The Widow

293 Sleep

391

Ruins of St. Coman's

294 Learned Operatives of the Old School

392

Poetry-To Infancy

295 Poetry-Spring

393

English Language

296

The Persian Slave

394

Poetry- Thou Wast not There

297 | Chronicles of Sienna-(Continued 412)

396

The Maniac

298 Railways

400

Legend of Carrigafoile— The Ear-ring 299 Jealousy, or La Belle Fiancée—(Continued 421) 403

Poetry-Herod's Death

300 Theory of the Earth

407

The Wreck

301 | Architecture

407

Poetry—The Even

303 Homeless Son—(Concluded)

408

The Fountain Tree

304 Emigration to Australia

410

The Homeless Son-(Continued 323)

305 Poetry- The Widow's Farewell

411

The Nerves

309 Avarice

411

Antartic Expedition

310 | Chronicles of Sienna (Concluded)

Colour of the Ocein

311 Poetry-Solitude

413

Poetry-Song

311 Perilous Encounter with Icebergs

414

Farewell

312 Special Function of the Skin

415

Electricity

313 Poetry-To the Lee

415

The Maid of Mourne-(Continued 330) 314 Origin the Names of the Days in the Week 416

Monetary System of America

317 Poetry- The Bereaved

416

Chronicles of Sienna-(Continued 348) 318 Animal Magnetism

417

Poetry-My Own Fire-side

320 Capabilities of Women

418

Irish Legend

321 Poetry-Absence

418

Homeless Son-(Continned 343)

323 The Sociality of Man

419

Porters of Damascus

326 | Poetry-Love

420

Poetry_Come Where Flowers are Springing 327 Chinese Texts

420

-Star Gazing

328 Jealousy, or La Belle Fiancéc—(Concluded) 421

Measures of Weight

328 Poetry--Constancy

Poetry- The Captured Scout

329 Study of Natural Philosophy

424

Maid of Mourne-(Concluded)

330 | Heat

424

Poetry—Spring

333 Poetry—Song of Sorrow

424

Shakspeare's Twelfth Night

334 Great Pyramid of Gizeb

424

The Diamond

338 | Bazaars in Constantinople

425

Poetry-Lines to Beppo

338 Tulips

425

Benjamin Block's Log-(Continued 358)

339 Bathing

425

Homeless Son-(Continued 376)

343 Emigration to Australia

426

Division of Time

345 Retreat from Cabul

427

Earthquake in India

346 The Evil Eye

427

Poetry--Thought on the Past

346 Poetry-On Friends that are dead

427

Sulphuric Acid

317 | Eddystone Lighthouse

427

Chronicle of Sienna-(Continued 396)

348 Paddy the Leaper

428

The Human Figure

345 Poetry- The Soldier's Farewell

Colonel Blood's attempted robbery of the Regalia 353 The Turf Bogs of Ireland

430

Poetry-Lines Written in Liverpool

353 | Kyan's Anti-Dry-rot Solution

430

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THE DUBLIN JOURNAL

OF TEMPERANCE, SCIENCE, AND LITERATURE.

VOL. II.-No. 1.

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY.

PRICE 11d.

OSSIAN'S POEMS.

of Irish worthies, remarkable for genius, talent, and A correspondent, whose letter we subjoin, has creative power, let us dever fail to emblazon, in

brilliant characters, the melodious name of_Ossian. brought before us matter for fair and impartial examination. He is a lover of Erin's immortal bard,

TO THE EDITOR OF THE DUBLIN JOURNAL.

24th Oct., 1842. and regrets, in common with other Irishmen, that this gifted child of song should lie comparatively un

DEAR SIR-On lately looking over No. 80 of the Monthly noticed and unknown. What did Macpherson in his Magazine for Sept.

, 1820, published by Bently, of Dorset-street, version but rend into prosaic piecemeal, like the torn London, I found the following singular announcement:

"Extract of a letter from Belfast, dated 4th August, 1820.Absyrtus, the body and soul of the poet's creations ?

Discovery of the Original Ossian 's Poems.--On opening a vault The disjecta membra poetæ were distinguished, no where stood the cloisters of the old Catholic Abhey at Connor,

founded by St. Patrick, the workmen discovered an oak chest doubt, but the poetic fire was, phænix-like, inde

of curious workmanship, the contents of which proved to be a structible; else, it were quenched for ever. We have translation of the Bible in the Irish character, and other MSS. no doubt but that the original MS. of our bard, in that language. The chest was immediately forwarded to

the Rev. Dr. Henry, who, not knowing the aboriginal language, alluded to in the subjoined letter, lies in the archives

sent it to Dr. Macdonald, of Belfast, who soon discovered the of the Belfast Academy. Dr. Macdonald certainly, MSS. to be the original poems of Ossian, written (rend copied) we would say, who examined it, would be able to give by an Irish friar of the name of Terence O'Neal, in the year the required information; and our hope is, that he

Now you would greatly oblige some of your antiquarian will do so. As to the genuineness of the poems alluded readers (and myself among the number) by giving any inforto, we have no difficulty; for where is it more

mation in your power respecting these highly interesting and likely to find an author's works than in the country valuable national MSS. I should like to know what has be. of his birth ?_where would the broken strings be come of them, and also of a translation said to be written by found but where the lyre was wont to hang ?--and Baron Harold, and dedicated to our countryman, the celebrated where, we would emphatically demand, could such a Edmund Burke, which, it is said, greatly surpasses Macgarland of wild flowers be enwreathed, redolent of pherson's. beauty and romance, but in the.“ Sweet land of the

I am, Sir, yours most respectfully, West”? Yes, we fully agree with Lady Morgan, that Ossian was a veritable Irishman, and believe

TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS. that, like the Spartan Tyrtæus, he called forth such strains from his rude chords, that, by thus inspiriting but we cannot insert them. Many of them, we per

We are very grateful for several contributions ; his countrymen to battle, he used as fatal a weapon ceive, are of a high order, but we are sedulously as if he discharged his arrows from the bow-string anxious to “make no honest man our foe” by an Love, too_that universal ingredient in the composi- attack on any one. The slightest tincture of religious tion of a true-hearted Irishman_beams from his untutored verse; nor can we find a more appropriate

or political acrimony, we may say with Horace, and name to call him than the Irish Homer, in order to promise too_" procul abfore chartis." There is a express all we think and feel concerning him.

common green spot yet in the Emerald Isle, where

all that love their country can cordially shake hands. It may be said, that as the Celtic and Erse dia- Thither we invite them in the spirit of love and good lects closely approximate, so, it is not unlikely that

will. what was really Scotch would be called Irish. To

We wish it to be particularly understood that we this we reply, that remark cuts as much one way as

will not insert any paper or correspondence of which another. For why is it not as likely that our north.

the entire has not been forwarded. ern friends should have appropriated Ossian, though thoroughly Irish, as we believe he was ? Let us

All articles sent to us for insertion we shall assume are then, respect his memory, and esteem him as our own.

ORIGINAL, excepting, of course, such as are acknowledged to Let us proudly point to him as the Chaucer of Irish

be selections, or which we know to be so. We, therefore, shall poetry, who brought the first-fruits of his effusions not ticket each paper, prose or as "original" in future, as an offering to the Epic Muse; and in the long roll Such is the custom cf other periodicals.

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SHAKSPEARE.

-D.

THE ANONYMOUS LETTER.

rival, and did not bear with equanimity the success,

(which, to every one but himself, was apparent,) but “For jealousy is the rage of a man, therefore he will not spare set afloat various slanderous rumours, in order to in the day of vengeance."—Prov, vi. 34.

injure him in the estimation of the girl's mother, who “Cut off even in the blossom of my sin,

had all along opposed him, and countenanced Thurlo. Unhouselled, unanointed, unanealed,

Harassed and irritated by the conduct of Jane, No reckoning made, but sent to my account

Thurlo at length resolved to come to an understand. With all my imperfections on my head.”—

ing on the subject; and with this resolution, having

screwd his courage up to the sticking point, he set The following sketch, all the events of which are off late one evening to her mother's dwelling, and perfectly true, is written with the hope that it may be arrived there just in time to see the man he detested

leave the house. This did not alter his purpose, the means of exhibiting in its true colours the base but rather sharpened it, inasmuch as his rising anger practice of anonymous letter-writing, and of pointing proved more than a match for the bashfuluess which out the evil effects which sometimes result from it. before had oppressed him. If it should be the means of preventing a single ano

“ Well, Jane,” said he, on entering, “ I hope

you have had a pleasant visit from Mnymous letter from being written, the author will

" A very pleasant one, I can assure you,” was the consider that he has rendered some service to society, reply. ** And may I ask,” returned he, “what and that his labour has not been in vain :

brought him here at this hour?" Perhaps the

same business brought him here that brought your. A very few years back, there resided, near the town self.” This reply staggered Thurlo not a little : of N-ch, in Cheshire, a nurseryman and gardener, but summoning up his courage, which was ebbing named Thurlo, who bore amongst his neighbours, fast, he again addressed her—" That may or may and indeed amongst all those who had any dealings not be, but let us go now to your mother, and I will with him, a high reputation for steadiness and inte, tell you my business by and bye." grity. The consequence was, that his fruits and

They accordingly went in, and sat chatting with the Howers were always most sought after, and every one old woman, who, in about half an hour, retired to wished to procure their seed from his shop, knowing bed, leaving the lovers alone. He immediately seized that they could safely rely upon its being good and the opportunity, and pleaded his cause with all the recent. 'Added to all this, he was of a very hand. ardour and eloquence of impassioned love. some exterior ; and this, we know, is no small attrac

Jane, however, was insensible to every solicitation ; tion to the soft sex, of whom the greater part of his she, in the most heartless way, resolved to make the customers consisted. He had been in business a

man she really loved, thoroughly miserable, by little more than six years, when the circumstances leaving him in distressing doubt, and thus immolated occurred which led to the tragical catastrophe of this his most sacred feelings on the demon altar of her narrative. As I have before said, he was a pretty inordinate vanity. After having plied her in vain general favourite ; yet the most excellent will have with every species of prayers and entreaties, Thurlo their enemies, and he was not an exception. There went away angry and dispirited, threatening, as he was one individual, who took every opportunity of took his departure, that she should yet sorely regret making him feel his enmity, and this apparently for her obstinacy. When he was gone, she felt comno other reason than that he, through integrity and punctious visitings for her conduct, and, with dire good conduct, had stepped into a business, which the misgivings lest she should have alienated him for ever, other had lost through dishonesty and dissipated and foreboding of some coming calamity, she sat by habits. This person had at one time been his bosom the fire occupied with painful reflections, until it had friend, but latterly their friendship had ceased, and quite burned out, when, suddenly recollecting herself, gave place to deepest hatred; thus verifying the trite she retired to bed, where she cried herself to sleep. remark, that he who has injured you will be your most But, alas! matters did not end here. A few days inveterate foe. But here we must introduce to our subsequent to the evening to which I have alluded, readers a new and rather important character in this Thurlo, whose love for Jane was still as strong as eventful drama-viz., Miss Jane — who, for beauty both of face and figure, bore the palm from all, it, received an anonymous letter, bearing the post

ever, although his pride forbade him to acknowledge whether aristocratic or otherwise, who frequented mark of a distant town. This letter stated that his Thurlo's garden ; she was indeed a perfect little sweetheart had absolutely pledged herself to his derustic beauty, and, had you seen her tripping lightly tested rival. to market, with her basket of fruits and Howers, you This intelligence was maddening and unexpected, would have agreed with me that a poet or a painter for he had hitherto all along attributed her behaviour might make her the model for his Pomona or his

to the real cause, and consequences resulted which, Flora, and acknowledge that it was no wonder a

it is to be hoped, the unhappy author neither foresaw susceptible heart should be deeply interested for her. nor intended. Thurlo fell sick, so much so, that he

My readers, I am sure, anticipate that Mr. Thurlo was obliged to keep his bed for two days. During is unable to resist her attractions, and falls despe- that period, when his mind had full leisure to brood rately in love with the fruit girl. He too was not over his imagined loss, he formed the resolution, the without favour in her eyes. No, no-Miss Jane had moment he was able to get up, to go once more to rather too much sense, and too little inclination, to re-Jane, and ask her to become his; and, should she ject such a promising suitor ; but, like most women, refuse, he made up his mind (to use his own expreshaving a spice of the coquette in her disposition, sion) that “if he should not have her, no one else she was in the habit of frequently making her swain should.” wretched. This she managed to do by leading him Jane also, during this interval, had received another to believe, from sundry hints and inuendoes, that she anonymous letter, telling her that Thurlo was not the had another more fortunate suitor, and to insinuate man she thought him : that not only was he wooing that the man whom I have mentioned as his bitterest her for the sake of her money, (about £300,) but enemy, was the favoured one in her affections. This that, at the same time, he was attached to an improper statement, although really untrue, yet to Thurlo it female. This intelligence touched two of the most bore the semblance of truth, and not groundless, for sensitive chords of a woman's heart-and, alas ! too the person alluded to had, from the first, been his true they responded.

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