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Am # 75

TRANSFERRED TO
NAVARO COLLEGE LIBRARY

Aug22.1935

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1868, by

EDWARD MCPHERSON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the District of Columbia.

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PREFACE.

Those who have seen the POLITICAL MANUALS of 1866 and 1867 will understand the scope of this volume, when told that, upon the same plan it continues the record from the date at which the latter, Manual closed, April 1, 1867, to July 15, 1868. This period has witnessed the complete development of the Congressional Plan of Reconstruction and the Restoration of several States under it. All the Votes, Acts, Orders, and Papers connected therewith will be found gathered and appropriately classified.

The volume contains an abstract of the various new Constitutions and of the Orders of the Commanders of the several Military Districts; the Votes in Congress, State Legislatures, and at the polls on the various topics which have arisen; also the action of President Johnson, his Proclamations and Orders, the attempted Impeachment by the House of Representatives, with the Articles, the Answer of the President, and the Judgment of the Senate; and copious Tables on Revenue and Taxation, Estimates and Appropriations, Banks, Debt, Elections, &c.

In it will also be found General Grant's Political Record, including a full copy of his Testimony, before the Judiciary Committee, on Reconstruction; his Correspondence with President Johnson on various subjects; his PoliticoMilitary Orders, and his relations to Reconstruction. The usual lists of the Cabinet and Congress; the Votes on Political Bills and Resolutions; the National Platforms of 1852, 1856, 1860, 1864, and 1868, with the Letters of Acceptance of the Candidates of the two great parties; and a chapter of General Political Miscellany, will, it is hoped, furnish every important political fact which fairly enters into the great political struggle before the country.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 15, 1868.

EDWARD MCPHERSON.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

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PART III.

POLITICAL MANUAL FOR 1868.

XXIII.

ORDERS, LETTERS, MESSAGE AND VOTES IN THE SENATE

RESPECTING SECRETARY STANTON.

Request for Mr. Stanton's Resignation and Reply. 1.-PRESIDENT JOHNSON TO SECRETARY STANTON. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, August 5, 1867. SIR: Public considerations of a high character constrain me to say that your resignation as Secretary of War will be accepted. Very respectfully, ANDREW JOHNSON. To Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

2.-SECRETARY STANTON TO PRESIDENT JOHNSON. WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, August 5, 1867.

SIR: Your note of this day has been received, stating that public considerations of a high character constrain you to say that my resignation as Secretary of War will be accepted.

In reply, I have the honor to say that public considerations of a high character, which alone have induced me to continue at the head of this Department, constrain me not to resign the office of Secretary of War before the next meeting of Congress. Very respectfully, yours, EDWIN M. STANTON.

To the PRESIDENT.

Secretary Stanton's Suspension. 3.-PRESIDENT JOHNSON TO SECRETARY STANTON. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, August 12, 1867

SIR: By virtue of the power and authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, you are hereby suspended from office as Secretary of War, and will cease to exercise any and all functions pertaining to the same. You will at once transfer to General Ulysses S. Grant, who has this day been authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, all records, books, papers, and other public property now in your custody and charge.

Very respectfully, yours, ANDREW JOHNSON. To Hon. EDWIN M STANTON, Secretary of War.

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-PRESIDENT JOHNSON TO GENERAL GRANT. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, August 12, 1867. BIR: The honorable Edwin M. Stanton having been this day suspended as Secretary of War, you are hereby authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, and will at once enter upon the discharge of the duties of that office.

The Secretary of War has been instructed to transfer to you all records, books, papers, and other public property now in his custody and charge. Very respectfully, yours,

ANDREW JOHNSON. To General ULYSSES S. GRANT, Washington, D. C.

5.-GENERAL GRANT TO SECRETARY STANTON. HEADQ'RS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, WASHINGTON, D. C., August 12, 1867. SIR: Enclosed herewith I have the honor to transmit to you a copy of a letter just received from the President of the United States, notifying me of my assignment as Acting Secretary of War, and directing me to assume those duties at once.

In notifying you of my acceptance, I cannot let the opportunity pass without expressing to you my appreciation of the zeal, patriotism, firmness, and ability with which you have ever discharged the duties of Secretary of War. With great respect, your obedient servant, U. S. GRANT, General. To Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

6.-SECRETARY STANTON TO PRESIDENT JOHNSON, WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, August 12, 1867. SIR: Your note of this date has been received, informing me that, by virtue of the power and authority vested in you as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States, I am suspended from office as Secretary of War, and will cease to exercise any and all functions pertaining to the same, and also directing me at once to transfer to General U. S. Grant, who has this day been authorized and empowered to act as Secretary of War ad interim, all records 261

books, papers, and other public property now in my custody and charge.

Under a sense of public duty I am compelled to deny your right, under the Constitution and laws of the United States, without the advice and consent of the Senate, and without legal cause, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or the exercise of any or all functions pertaining to the same, or without such advice and consent to compel me to transfer to any person the records, books, papers, and public property in my custody as Secretary. But inasmuch as the General commanding the armies of the United States has been appointed ad interim, and has notified me that he has accepted the appointment, I have no alternative but to submit, under protest, to superior force. Very respectfully, yours, EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

To the PRESIDENT.

7.-SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL GRANT. WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, August 12, 1867. GENERAL: Your note of this date, accompanied by a copy of a letter addressed to you, August 12, by the President, appointing you Secretary of War ad interim, and informing me of your acceptance of the appointment, has been received.

Under a sense of public duty I am compelled to deny the President's right, under the Constitution and laws of the United States, to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, or to authorize any other person to enter upon the discharge of the duties of that office, or to require me to transfer to you or any other person the records, books, papers, and other property in my official custody and charge as Secretary of War.

But, inasmuch as the President has assured to suspend me from office as Secretary of War, and you have notified me of your acceptance of the appointment of Secretary of War ad interim, I have no alternative but to submit, under protest, to the superior force of the President.

You will please accept my acknowledgment of the kind terms in which you have notified me of your acceptance of the President's appointment, and my cordial reciprocation of the sentiments expressed.

I am, with sincere regard, truly yours,
EDWIN M. STANTON,
Secretary of War.

General ULYSSES S. GRANT.

Action of the Senate, January 13, 1868. January 13-The Senate resumed consideration of the following resolution, reported by the Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia,

the 10th instant:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Fessenden, Fowler, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Howard, Howe,

Morgan, Morrill of Maine, Morrill of Vermont, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Trumbull, Wade, Willey, Williams, NAYS-Messrs. Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Patterson of Tennessee-6.

Wilson-35.

NOT VOTING-Messrs. Grimes, Guthrie, Henderson, Hen

dricks, Johnson, Norton, Ross, Saulsbury, Sherman, Sprague, Van Winkle, Vickers, Yates-13.

Resolved, That having considered the evidence and reasons given by the President in his report of the 12th December, 1867, for the suspension from the office of Secretary of War of Edwin M. Stanton, the Senate do not concur in such suspension.

[The National Intelligencer stated, in its news columns, that Messrs. Henderson and Hendricks were paired, and that Mr. Ross, though present, declined to vote.]

Action of General Grant. HEADQUARTERS ARMIES UNITED STATES, WASHINGTON, D. C., January 14, 1868. SIR: I have the honor to enclose herewith copy of official notice received by me last evening of the action of the Senate of the United States in the case of the suspension of Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. According to the provisions of section two of "An act regulating the tenure of certain civil offices," my functions as Secretary of War ad interim ceased from the moment of the receipt of the within notice.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, General. His Excellency A. JOHNSON, President of the United States.

Subsequent Action of President Johnson. 1868, February 21-President Johnson sent this message to the Senate:

To the Senate of the United States:
WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1868.

On the 12th day of August, 1867, by virtue of the dent by the Constitution and laws of the United power and authority vested in the PresiStates, I suspended Edwin M. Stanton from the office of Secretary of War. In further exercise of the power and authority so vested in the President, I have this day removed Mr. Stanton General of the Army as Secretary of War ad from the office, and designated the Adjutant

interim.

Copies of the communications upon this subject, addressed to Mr. Stanton and the Adjutant General, are herewith transmitted for the information of the Senate. ANDREW JOHNSON.

[For copies of these orders, see the first and second Articles of Impeachment.]

Further Proceedings in the Senate. February 21-Mr. Edmunds submitted the following resolution for consideration:

the communication of the President stating that Resolved, That, having received and considered he had removed from office Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War, the Senate disapprove the action of the President.

The Senate, by unanimous consent, proceeded to consider the said resolution.

Mr. Dixon moved to amend the resolution, by striking out all after the word "Resolved," and

Which was determined in the affirmative inserting as follows: That the President be reyeas 35, nays 6, as follow: quested to inform the Senate by what authority he

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