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1. That the Government House be put in mourning on Friday morning, (10th instant) and to remain thus 30 days.

2. That the coffin be made, and trimmed with black crape and gold lace: --to be placed at the Government House on Wednesday, (8th inst.) and to remain there till Friday morning.

3. At 6 o'clock A. M. on the day above mentioned, the flags of the Colony, as well as the United States flag, at the Government House, will be hali masted and furled with black crape, at which time a gun will be fired, and continued at intervals of a half hour.

4. The civil officers and citizens generally, be requested to assemble at the Government House, at the hour of 9 o'clock A. M. of the above named day.

5. The different military corps, will parade in front of the Government House on Friday 10, inst., at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M.

The prosession will be formed as follows :-First the military-next the clergy-next the coffin supported by 6 officers as pall bearers, *-next His Honor the Lieut. Governor and Colonial Secretary-next the Colonial Legislature-next the Physician and Orator-next the Judges of the different Courts, and then the Citizens and strangers.

6. The procession, when formed will move up to, and around Chaver's corner-thence to the corner of the Presbyterian Church-thence down Broad Street, to Clark's corner-thence to the M. E. Church, where a serinon will be delivered.

After the ceremony is over in the Church, the procession will resume its order and proceed to the Government Square, where the coffin will be interred.

The civil and military officers, are requested to wear crape on the left arm 30 days

The different associations of the Colony, are also requested to wear their distinctive badges on that day.

All foreign as well as colonial vessels, are requested to half mast their flags on that day

Committee of ARRANGEMENTS.-H. TEAGE, M. C., D. JOHNSTON, M. C., L. Ciples, M. C., Major N. M. Hicks, Major B. P. YATES,

SEPTEMBER 6th, 1841.

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COLONIZATION Rooms,

WASHINGTON, 13th December, 1841. S At a meeting of the Executive Committee, and several members of the Board of Directors of the American Colonization Society now in the city, held this evening, the late despatches of Lieut. Governor, General J. J. RỌBERTS, detailing the circumstances of the death of the late THOMAS Buchanan, Governor of the Commonwealth of Liberia, having been read, the following preamble and resolutions were passed unanimously, viz :

Whereas God in the wise administration of his government, ha fit to remove by death the late Thomas Buchanan, Governor of the Commonwealth of Liberia, in whom centred the hopes of the friends of Colonization in this country, and the expectation and confidence of the citizens of Liberia, and has thus left a nation and a race, to mourn his, loss, therefore,

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*Majors J. W. Prout, and N. M. Hicks,-Captains R. WHITE, D. WHITE, D. MOORE, and D. P. Brown, were selected as pall bearers on the above mentioned occasion.

Resolved, That with humility and reverence we acknowledge the hand of an all wise and over-ruling God, in this afflicting dispensation.

Resolved, That we sincerely condole with the afflicted mother and relatives of our late Governor; and that as a testimony of our sympathy and sorrow, we will wear crape on the left arm for the space of thirty days.

Resolved, That we deeply sympathise with the citizens of Liberia in the loss which they have sustained, and we commend them to the protection and kind care of him who tempers the wind to the shorn lamb, and will not forsake any who put their trust in him.

Resolved, That we feel called upon to redouble our diligence and zeal in the prosecution of that noble cause for the promotion of which Governor Buchanan gave his valuable life.

Resolved, That we assure the American public of the great conf. dence which we repose in the Lieutenant Governor, Gen. J. J. Roberts, on whom the admistration of the Government of the Commonwealth devolves, for the time being, and that we trust the Colony will steadily advance in prosperity, industry, and general improvement.

Resolved, That the Rev. GEORGE W. Bethune, D. D., of Philadelphia, be requested to deliver a funeral discourse on the death of Governor Buchanan, at the annual meeting of the American Colonization Society, on the 18th proximo.

Resolved, That it be reconimended to all the clergy friendly to the scheme of Colonization, to preach a sermon with reference to the death of Governor BUCHANAN, on Sabbath the 230 January, and take up a col lection in aid of the cause to which he was so much devoted.

Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be transmitted to the friends of the late Governor BUCHANAN, and that they be sent to the Colony for insertion in their papers, and also that they be published in the various papers of this country.

A TRUE COPY,
Wm. McLAIN, Secretary, Ex. Com.

ANNUAL MEETING. The next annual meeting of the American Colonization Society will be held in the city of Washington on the 3rd Tuesday of January 1842, being the 18th day of the month. It is hoped that the delegates from all the different Societies will be

punotual in their attendance. Business of vast importance will be brought before them. The important interests of the great scheme of Colonization are substantially under their control and dependent on their wise deliberations.

MISSIONARIES FOR WESTERN AFRICA. The Rev. WILLIAM WALKER and wife and the Rev. BENJAMIN Gris WOLD, received their instructions as Missionaries to Western Africa at the Essex street church in Boston, on sabbath evening the 28th ult. The Rev. Dr. ANDERSON read the instructions of the Prudential Committee. The meeting was one of deep aud solemn interest. The Missionaries are destined to Cape Palmas and are expected to sail about this time.

We hope their lives may be.long spared in that land of darkness and death. Their help is greatly needed. May the Lord of the harvest protect and bless them

We have delayed the present number of the Repository a few days, in order to insert in it the important particulars respecting the death of his Excellency, Thomas Buchanan, which reached us just as the paper was going to press. Our readers will not find fault with us for this delay, for though it brings to them melancholy intelligence, it also brings all the cir. cumstances which we have received.

CONCLUSION. In offering to our readers the last number of our journal for the year 1841, we cannot refrain from expressing to them our sincere gratitude for the kindly manner in which they have welcomed our semi-monthly publication. We have received many tokens of their approbation. Often amid the toils and anxieties which have encompassed us on every hand, our spirit has been cheered by some assurance of their sympathy or some word of encouragement.

For all such attentions we are truly grateful. We shall remember them with delight as some of the green spots which have adorned our journey through life.

We trust our labors have not been entirely in vain. The cause which it has been our privilege to advocate is worthy of an abler pen. Sincerer devotion and better intentions, it could not have. If we have not accomplished all that was desirable, or expected of us, it has been for want of abi. lity and not through any obliquity of intention or indifference and sloth in the performance. To our numerous friends we wish a happy closing of the year.

And while they are selecting and making presents to their acquaintances and kindred, we entreat them also to remember the wants of colonization, to feel for those who are drawn unto death and ready to be slain : and to send by their contributions joy and gladness, life and salvation to thousands of the wretched and forlorn sons and daughters of Africa. Here your noblest powers may

find

scope for exercise. Here you may scatter seed which shall yield an everlasting harvest.

In many respects the past year has been a very eventful one for the cause of Colonization. The unexampled scarcity of money which has prevailed all over the country, has not been without its effects on the receipts of this Society. The expenses attending the support of the Colony have been large, owing to the fact that we have been under the necessity of purchasing more territory in order to preserve a continuous line of coast between our different settlements, which was indispensable to our continued welfare and prosperity.

And last, though not least, the death of Gov. BUCHANAN is an event unlike what has been recorded in the history of any year since that which told of the death of Ashmun.

The smile and blessing of Heaven has been upon the cause in a distinguished manner, for which we desire to send up our sincere gratitude. Without this we should have suffered shipwreck and loss of all that is valuable in this great enterprise. We look to our Heavenly Father for guidance and favor in the future, while we consecrate to him for this service our time and talents.

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

GRADUATE LIBRARY

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SERIAL

372

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