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Comparative statement of classified and part-time positions and costs for

1947 and 1948Continued

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Grand total.

14, 208

39, 623, 274

14, 845

42, 178, 089 District Training School Day care centers.

Comprrtire statement of per diem and temporary employment costs,

1947 and 1948

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Public Welfare:

Office of Director
Protective institutions:

Industrial Home School
Industrial Home School for Colored Children
llorne for Aged and Infirm.

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500 5,000 1.500 17.773

Total

28, 403

3,00

Public Works:

Superintendent of District Buildings.
Electrical Division
Central Garage
Street and Bridge Division (operating)
Street and Bridge Division (capital outlay).
Department of Vehicles and Traitic.
Divison of Trees and Parking
Refuse Division
Sewer Division (operating)
Sewer Division (capital outlay)
Water Division (operating)
Water Division (capital outlay).

Total...

201, 776
82, 500

47, 241
491, 486
75,000
80.929
117, 725
2, 332, 657

446,023
496, 226
OSS, 000
110,000

201,776
103, 614

58, 914 621, 851

75. SO, 9N

133, 133 2, 470, 021

495, 4102

744. 274.000

5, 232, 563

5, 722, 199

Washington aqueduct:

Operating expenses.
Capital outlay

588, 454
492, 080

603, 40N
346, 000

Total
National Guard.
National Capital Parks.
National Capital Park and Planning Commission
National Zoological Park.

1,080, 534

1. 419
538, 015

1, 800
7. 176

949, 405

1, 419 695, 005

1, 80 7, 176

Grand total.

8, 112, 078

8, 681, 713 70.0 07

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT

Chart showing estimated budget revenue for 1948, "Where the money comes from

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$1,600,000
2,000,000
5, 800,000
2,500,000

500,000

3, 533, 739

Real estate
Federal payment.
Gasoline
Individual income
Sales, amusement, cigarettes.
Alcoholic beverages.
Corporation net income
Personal
Public utilities
Earnings and miscellaneous
Federal Joan, water sund
Water rates
Licenses and permits
Motor vehicle fees, etc
1947 Surplus
Sale of securities
Motor vehicle, personal
Inheritance and estate
Miscellaneous receipts, water.
Insurance
Sale of securities, water
Unincorporated-business income.
Paving and water assessments.

28. 39 $27,000,000
8. 40 8,000,000
6.89 4,950,000
6. 20 3, 900, 000
6.10
5. 57 2. 800.000
5. 52 5, 250, 000
4. 13 3, 925, 000
4. 02 3, 325,000
3. 72 3, 545, 000
3. 71
3. 36 3, 200.000
2. 28 2, 170,000
1. 96 1, 799, 600
1. 76 1, 675, 701
1.44 1, 376, 200
1.31 1, 250.000
1. 26 1, 200,000
1. 24 205,000
1. 24 1, 185, 000

59 569, 200
52

. 39 275, 000

$29.01

8. 70 7.03 6.32 6. 23 5. 68 5. 64 4. 22 4. 11 3. 80 3. 78 3. 43 2. 33 2. 00 1.80 1. 46 1.34 1. 29 1. 27 1. 27

60 53

40

65, 000

983, 000

500,000

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Chart showing estimated budget erpenditures for 1948, Where the money goes"

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Public works
Public schools
Publie welfare
Health Department
Vetropolitan Police
Washington Aqueduct
Fire Department
Department of Corrections
Police and Fire Relief Fund
Courts
Compensation and Retirement.
National Capital Parks
Fiscal Service
Recreation Department
Public Library
Regulatory Agencies
General Administration
National Zoolovical Park
Veterans Series
Vational Capital Park an'i Planning Combission
District Debt Service (nighway)
National Guard...

26.49 $25, 191, 809
20.50 19, 195, 109
12. 38 11, 771, 300
8.61 8, 191,00)
6. 53 6, 215, 0)
4. 86 4, 626,0)
3.82 3, 631,099
2. 69 2, 534,00)
2. 42 2, 30).0
1. 94 1, 851, 80)
1. S1 1, 715,00)
1. 78 1, 666099
1.38 1, 303, 80)
1.29 1, 218.60)
1. 23 1, 167,00)
.98 933, 10)

402, 103
.48 455, 401
.12 112, 099
.03 73, 300

$27. 08 20. 96 12. 66 8. 81 6. 68 4. S7 3. 91 2.76 2. 47 1.99 1.84 1. 79 1. 41 1. 32 1. 25 1. 01

49

68, 602

12 .OS

07 .07

10)

Total
Estimated population, 930,000.

95, 032, 500

102.24

Mr. FOWLER. Now, to bring this picture, this budget picture, right up to date, it is my suggestion, if you would take a suggestion, that you permit Captain Whitehurst to tell you about the highway fund, and then Mr. Auld to tell you about the water fund, and having that full picture, we will be available to answer any questions that you care to ask us.

Senator Cain. Before you retire, there may be questions from the members of the joint committee.

Mr. BATEs. Mr. Fowler, while you are on the stand, I think we might just briefly discuss the so-called Overton-O'Mahoney formula.

Mr. FOWLER. Yes, sir.

Mr. Bates. I have that break-down here, and apparently something developed in connection with the principles embraced in the bill itself.

Now, this is a question I wanted to ask you. Do you think the determination of the Federal payment ought to be made entirely on the basis of the ratio, percentage ratio of land, say, owned by the Federal Government in the District, in comparison with the land owned by the District itself, tax property in the District, exempting, as that bill would under the formula, all the park area of the District of Columbia of the United States?

Mr. FowlER. Mr. Bates, one of the most difficult things in the world is to determine a fair and just formula. Now, this thing has been considered by experts for a long period of time.

Mr. BATES. Who are the experts?

Mr. FOWLER. Well, the experts that the Senate had were men who were formerly connected with the General Accounting Office and the Department of Justice, and had long years of experience in these matters. I just do not remember who they are—Mr. Feeney, Mr. Merrick, Mr. Scott, and Mr. Cooper, I think, and I am sure that you will have those gentlemen who prepared the formula here to testify before the committee. We went over this with them. The Federal Bureau of the Budget has also been considering this from all angles, and I think would agree that an accurate formula would be very hard to adopt; but this is about as near and as good an approach, as far as I am concerned, as has been advanced yet. The former Overton formula was somewhat different and would have given us a considerable amount of more revenue if it had been adopted. This has been changed so that we could get a little less revenue, but the Commissioners have approved it, and we think is just about as fair as one can be arrived at.

Mr. BATEs. You think it ought to be approached from the standpoint of the relative Federal property in the District less parks?

Mr. FOWLER. I think so.
Mr. Bates. Compared with the taxable property in the District.
Mr. FOWLER. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATEs. Or taxable land in the District.
Mr. FOWLER. Yes, sir.

Mr. BATEs. Has a study been made by these experts that you mention in relation to the services which cost money that the District of Columbia is compelled to render directly and indirectly to the maintenance of our Federal organization here?

Mr. Fowler. Well, I am not so sure, Mr. Bates, whether they have attempted to do that or not. Of course, we have that information;

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we have that data available, but I do not know whether it gives much consideration to that because it is so constantly changing. The Federal Government gives us services and we give them services. It is a very difficult thing to break down, and you will find out more about that when you talk with some of the gentlemen from the acqueduct and water service.

Mr. Bates. You say that you will see that we get that information as to what the reciprocal arrangements are between the District government and the Federal Government?

Mr. FOWLER. Yes, sir, we have that information.
Mr. BATEs. We will go into that.

Mr. FOWLER. Yes, we will go into this. But may I say something about it while I have the chance, because I may not be back: That the consideration of the formula and the amount of payment to the Federal Government should have no relation whatsoever to our financial condition. Even if we had $50,000,000 surplus, we still should have an adjusted equitable formula or agreement toward what the Federal Government's share toward the District of Columbia may be.

Mr. BATES. As I said previously, the situation here is not dissimilar to what it is in other parts of the country. Mr. FOWLER. That is true.

Mr. BATES. We have had responses that we have made to States and communities to show that many community tax-exempt properties run from 40 to 50 percent, and even higher in many communities throughout the country as a result of State institutions, Federal institutions, charitable institutions, and so forth, which under the law are tax-exempt, and educational institutions, and we find in many States of the Union where Federal property comprises a very large percentage of the entire area of the State; so, it is not a dissimilar situation in that respect of tax-exempt property compared with taxable property Mr. FOWLER. Only a slight difference, no, I think it is a big differ

Your States can expand; we cannot. Mr. BATES. Well, of course, the biggest difference that I see is that you are rendering a great deal of service here that apparently has not been considered in this formula ; that is the great difference as I see it, that in this District, you are compelled to render service. It costs a lot of money to render that service, where in these other States, they are not compelled to render like services.

Mr. O'HARA. I would like to ask Mr. Fowler some questions. What has been the percentage increase of the demand for services by the Federal Government which the District has been paying the bill? Have you any way of giving us that? We know in a general way that there has been a constant increase, is not that true?

Mr. FOWLER. There has been a constant increase because the city, as you know, has doubled in population. We have to give the Federal Government police protection, fire protection; we lay the water mains and have to lay the streets in front of property; we do all of these things; we give them eight, nine hundred thousand dollars worth of water, and many of these things that we have listed, and can present for the record. But that is constantly increasing due to the increased size of the city.

Mr. O'HARA. What is the relationship of the land occupied by the Federal Government and that which is owned by the District? I have

ence.

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