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tuition; that is for 1947; and table B gives a similar break-down for 1937, which gives you a comparison.

Mr. Bates. I presume there are some school buildings in Maryland and Virginia right over the line, and the parents have a right, of course, to send their children to those schools?

Mr. CORNING. Yes, sir.

Mr. BATEs. But for some reason or other, probably because of superior education, as we have heard it expressed, they decide to send them to the District of Columbia, and we must educate them here at the expense of the taxpayers of the District.

Now, if we have, say, 3,000 of such students whose parents are actually domiciled in Maryland and Virginia, and if we use the average cost of $139 per pupil, as set forth in the statement of the Bureau of the Census, that means the taxpayers of the District, for the exactly 3,270 pupils, must pay out nearly a half million dollars to educate those children.

Mr. CORNING. That is correct.

Mr. BATEs. But beyond that, if you divide the 3,000 children by 30 to a classroom, that means that we are providing 100 classrooms also.

Mr. CORNING. Theoretically.

Mr. BATES. As a capital expenditure if, of course, we have not got the room in individual classrooms to put those children. Now, it seems that is a very important question that we ought to decide here, and I see no reason, just because a man works for the Government that he ought to have the privilege of having the District of Columbia educate his children at the expense of the taxpayers of the District. I do not know the logic behind it, and I think it is well for us to find out.

Mr. CORNING. I have put into your hand a series of citations of congressional action which has been taken on that thing.

Mr. BATEs. Yes. With all the information we have before us, Mr. Corning, we are a little ahead of your testimony in many respects, because we have been giving a good deal of attention to these studies over a period of several weeks.

As I said, I would like to have that break-down of classrooms, the number of individual classrooms; you do not have to make up any special report. If you have one already available. I want to quickly look it over and just get the background of that information.

Mr. CORNING. Yes.

Mr. Bates. I think that is about all I am interested in unless you have something further to offer.

Mr. CORNING. As you proceed in your deliberations, if there is anything at all, any question that arises in your mind, and any information that we can provide you with, we will be most happy to do so.

Mr. Bares. You agree with the statement of mine that taking the basic salaries of 1937, say $2,200, and adding this $750 to that figure, that will mean about a 70 percent increase in teachers' salaries since 1937.

Mr. Corning. I have no doubt that your computation is correct ; I have not done that particular kind of computation, but I would like to say in that connection, sir, that you are starting from a base which was shamefully low; the 1937 level of salaries in the District of Columbia was extraordinarily low.

(Additional information later received for the record is as follows:)

Washington public school salaries in comparison with those paid in large city

school systems, as reported for 1934 by the National Education Association

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Public schools of the District of ColumbiaComparison of minimum and maximum salaries paid to public-school teachers and percent of increase for the years indicated

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Public schools of the District of ColumbiaPercent of increase of minimum and

maximum salaries to be paid teachers under the proposed salary increase for 1948

Salaries for 1937

Proposed sal-
aries for 1918

Percent of in-
crease, 1918
over 1937

School level

Salary
class

Degree required

Mini-
Inum

Maxi-
mum

Mini-
mum

Maxi-
mum

Mini-
mum

Maxi-
mum

Elementary schools.
Junior high schools.

Do
Senior high schools.

1A.
2A
20
ЗА

do...

Bachelor of arts. $1,400

1, 600 Master of arts.. 1, 800 do..

1, 800

$2,200
2, 400
2, 800
2,800

$2,500 $3,700
2,500 3,700
3,000 4, 200
3,000 4,200

78.6
56. 3
66.7
66.7

68. 2 54, 2 50.0 50. O

Source: Office of the Statistician, Mar. 28, 1947.

Senator Cain. They were low throughout the country.
Mr. Corning. And we were low in comparison with that.

Mr. Bates. When we get the bill before us we will have further testimony on that, Mr. Corning.

Mr. CORNING. We will be prepared to testify any way you want. Mr. BATES. We are very much obliged to you.

Mr. FOWLER. Mr. Chairman, do I understand you are finished with the schools?

Senator Cain. Only on a temporary basis, probably until such time as we get

Mr. FOWLER. Will you proceed this afternoon with other witnesses?

Senator Cain. No; we will adjourn now until 10 o'clock tomorrow morning, asking first if the engineers can confer with us; and I would suggest that we would like to hear, if it is convenient for him, from General Young, in order that he may lay down the broad over-all pattern.

Mr. BATEs. Did you have any testimony to offer in respect to the operation of the recreational facilities in connection with the District operation and national park operations? Did you have any comment that you wish to make on that?

Mr. Corning. Except to say, and I can say it in just a moment, that we have a very fine relationship with the recreational department.

Mr. BATES. Of the District.

Mr. CORNING. They use our facilities, our buildings and grounds, and we are cooperating in the purchase of sites so that in certain centers complete recreational facilities will be provided both for the schools and the community. We have a very fine relationship existing there.

Mr. Bates. Thank you, Mr. Corning.

(Whereupon, at 11: 50 a. m., the committee took an adjournment until 10 a. m. Thursday, March 26, 1947.)

(Statement later received for the record from Public Schools of the District of Columbia.)

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NOTE.—The above-mentioned increases from 1937 through 1946 were provided by Congress for the following purposes:

1. To provide increases in personal services as follows:

(a) New positions for officers, clerks, teachers, and custodians, to staff 20 new buildings and 26 new additions to buildings which came into use during the 10-year period from 1937 through 1946.

(6) Salary increases required by law, including automatic longevity increases for teachers and school officers, within-grade promotions for classified employees, and additional funds required by legislation increasing the basic rates of pay for all public school employees.

(c) Additional new positions to provide for expansion of existing services.

(d) Additional personnel required to equalize work loads in the public schools.

(e) Increases for per diem personal services, including personal services for evening schools, summer schools, and other activities under the jurisdiction of the Board of Education. 2. To provide increases in other obligations as follows:

(a) Additional funds to provide for increases in normal maintenance and operation costs.

(b) To provide funds for special repair and replacement items, such as replacement of furniture and equipment, repair and replacement of boilers, heating plants, toilet facilities, drinking fountains, and other repairs to buildings.

(C) Increases required by law, such as funds for the education of children of deceased World War veterans, maintenance and instruction of deaf, dumb, and blind children, and increases required in the teachers' retirement appropriated fund, based upon actuarial valuations of the teachers' retirement fund made by the United States Treasury Department.

(d) Increases required because of rises in prices.

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