Page images
PDF
EPUB

in Washington. It is more or less a courtesy, but, of course, it entails additional manpower.

Mr. Bates. I wish you would provide the committee also with a memorandum embracing all of those questions we have discussed here.

Commissioner Young. We do detail policemen to guard all of the Embassies and Legations, and to my mind and the Commissioners' minds, it is absolutely 100 percent Federal responsibility. They should have soldiers there. We do 24-hour jobs there, besides the private parties at the different Legations and Embassies.

Mr. BATES. You mean you have a certain number of police officers assigned to check around the Embassies all of the time?

Commissioner Young. Probably to handle the traffic out front, or something like that.

Mr. Cox. I might add, sir, that a 24-hour detail would involve four

men,

Mr. BATES. That 24-hour detail, would that apply to some specific embassy or group of embassies?

Mr. Thomas. It would apply to any place where we are working if the dignitaries of the foreign governments are assigned there. It so happens now that on our legations and so forth, we have taken those details off recently. They are not now required.

Occasionally we are called on when there is a possibility of some disturbance, or something like that, between one country and another, and then we are called on to fill in, with two or three men on 24 hours a day.

Mr. Bates. For a member of days? Mr. Thomas. Yes, sir. We wait for the occasion to arise. • The commanding officer in that area usually keeps himself well posted to know what is going on, and he calls administrative headquarters. Those men are placed by the direction of our personnel officer.

Mr. BATEs. That is all. Does anyone else have any questions? Or do you

have anything else you wish to say, Chief?
Mr. THOMAS. Nothing else, sir.
Mr. Bates. You will provide that memorandum?
Mr. THOMAS. I shall, sir.
Mr. Klein. May I ask one question ?
Mr. BATEs. Yes; Mr. Klein.
Mr. KLEIN. You have Capitol Police under your supervision?
Mr. Thomas. Metropolitan Police. Not Capitol Police.

Mr. Bates. In addition to the Capitol Police, Chief, we have other police here?

Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir. The United States Park Police.
Mr. Bates. How many are there in that force?

Mr. Thomas. Slightly over 100. . I am not in a position to say exactly how many.

Mr. Bates. They patrol the parks?

Mr. THOMAS. That is right. I might add in that connection that Mr. Beall of Maryland introduced a bill which provides that the expense pertaining to park police patrolling within the District of Columbia, be charged to the Federal budget and credited to the District of Columbia.

99838–47410

That amounts to about $100,000, I am informed.

Incidental to that, the United States Park Police are included within the budget of the District of Columbia. The White House, and the Secret Service are included in our retirement fund.

Mr. BATEs. You mean to say the United States Park Police is in this total of personnel you gave us here!

Mr. THOMAS. Not in the personnel, but in the Retirement Act.
Mr. BATES. Just the Retirement Act?
Mr. Thomas. Amounting to sixty-nine thousand-some-odd dollars.

Mr. Bates. But the payment of those 100 or more United States Park Police, are their salaries from the Federal budget or the District budget?

Mr. THOMAS. You know, patrolling within the bounds of the District of Columbia has been, as I understand it, charged to the District of Columbia. In other words, the District pays it.

Mr. Bates. Is it a possible item in the appropriations?
Mr. Cox. That is not included in the appropriation.
Mr. Thomas. It is in the general fund.
Mr. BATEs. What general fund?
Mr. Thomas. Independent officers appropriation; is it not?

Mr. WILDING. May I answer that: In the District budget there is included an item for Park Police under National Park Service in the Department of the Interior.

In that “Park Police” item are provided in the fiscal year, 74 Park Police. It is requested that in 1948, 78 be provided.

The force, as shown here, is the present fiscal year, $252,000, and 1948 is proposed as $268,000.

That represents the number of Park Police performing service within the District of Columbia, and in addition there are, as Superintendent Thomas has indicated, a number of some 30 or more men performing service on the Memorial Boulevard and other areas outside of the District of Columbia.

Mr. BATEs. Are there any other questions?

Mr. Smith. You gave the percentage of policemen to the 1,000 population over the years?

Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.

Mr. SMITH. How does that compare with the average city of comparable size?

Mr. THOMAS. I made that compilation there with respect to New York City, just after I got notice.

I only compiled one figure, and New York City has a budget with the population estimated, I believe, at somewhere around 7,500,000.

Their budget calls for eighteen-thousand-and-some-odd police officers in New York City. I do not recall the exact figure, but over 18,000.

I believe they have fifteen-thousand-and-some-odd at the present time, but their budget calls for over 18,000. They figure at that rate slightly better than 2.5.

Mr. Smith. You have not any comparable figures on cities of comparable size?

Mr. Thomas. No, sir.

Mr. SMITH. Can you tell us how the rate of salaries on your police department compares with cities of comparable size?

Mr. Thomas. Practically the same as related by the fire chief here. Some cities get more. We are in that group somewhere near the top of the cities of comparable size, 500,000 or more.

Mr. SMITH. Thank you.

Mr. Bates. What was the pay of a private in 1937? You have got three grades of private?

Mr. Cox. The top grade of private was $2,400.
Mr. BATES. The same as the fire?
Mr. THOMAS. Yes.
Mr. BATES. What is it today?
Mr. THOMAS. The top grade is $3,398.11.
Mr. Bates. What was the top grade in 1937?
Mr. Cox. $2,400.
Mr. BATES. What is it today?

Mr. THOMAS. $3,398.11. That is the top-grade private. The sixth grade. It takes 6 years for them to reach that grade. Graduated $100 automatic raise per year.

Mr. Bates. So that the percentage increase in the pay schedules has been about the same as the fire department?

Mr. THOMAS. About the same. I could give the percentage increases if you would like, on the various grades.

Mr. Bares. You can put it in the record at this point, Chief.
Mr. THOMAS. All right, sir.
(The information is as follows:)

Metropolitan Police Department, District of Columbia, per annum salary

schedule, July 1, 1930, to present

[blocks in formation]

1 Rank of corporal authorized on July 1, 1944. ? Any grade of private may be assigned to. * Technician authorized July 1, 1946.

Information from the annual report of the police department of the city of

New York, calendar year 1945
Personnel :
Budget quota

18, 816 men On rolls-Dec. 31, 1945

15, 068 Population.

17,500,000 Police per 1,000 population--

2.6 1 Estimated.

Decrease and increase in the force beginning with the fiscal year of 1908

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

12
12
12
12
13

[ocr errors]

3

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

13

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

16 123 45 36

25
8

1908. 1909 1910 1911. 1912 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917 1918. 1919. 1920. 1921 1922 1923. 1924. 1925 1926. 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940. 1941 1942. 1943. 1944, 19456 19466 19476

13 13 13 13 15 18 21 21 21 21 21 20 20 21 21 21 22 37 39

1

10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
13
14
14
14
15
15
15
17
15
14
13
13
13
14
14
16
16
17
17
17
16
14
14
14

45 45 45 45 46 46 46 46 46 46 50 54 56 56 56 56 55 55 56 56 56 56 57 57 57 53 53 53 53 54 55 58 59 59 65 65 65 66 06 66

659
659
659
659
660
658
649
640
640
640
650
766
804
804
840
865

872
1. 057
1. 185
1, 185
1, 185
1, 163
1, 161
1, 172
1, 171
1, 202
1, 204
1, 194
1, 227
1, 249
1, 273
1, 273
1, 297
1, 313
1, 577
1, 702
1, 701
1,634
1, 634
1, 537

[ocr errors]

731 731 731 732 735 733 724 715 715 715 731 854 899 935 935 930

958 1, 153 1, 282 1, 284 1, 285 1, 162 2, 262 1, 290 1, 290 1, 316 1, 306 1, 306 1, 341 1, 366 1, 391 1, 397 1, 422 1, 437 1, 711 1, 836 1,836 1,836 1,836 1,739

[merged small][ocr errors]

1

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

4 35
3 25
25
25

6
25
15
274
125

[blocks in formation]

1 97

Increase to give 1 day off in 7. ? Increased to take care of the increase of lieutenants so they could work 8 hours a day. $ Crossing men transferred from street crossing roll to the pay roll of the Metropolitan Police Department (increase only on paper).

* 35 men to replace the decrease brought about by the economy act.
$ 25 men to take care of annual leave which was increased.
* The rank of corporal created with the appointment of 65 men.
i Congress refused to return to full strength after war.

Mr. BATEs. About 94 percent of your increase in cost is due to personnel cost?

Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.
Mr. Bates. And 40 percent of that is due to increase of wages!
Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. And balance due to the increase in numbers?
Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. Are there any other questions! Thank you, sir.

Mr. THOMAS. I have here, if you would like to hear it, what I like to boast over, our good record with respect to clearance of crime.

In 1936, 8,926 felonies were reported, and out of those reported we cleared 70.2 percent.

I would like to state at this time that the national average of crime clearance is 52 to 54 percent, so we feel rather proud of that record.

In 1946, we had reported 8,426, and cleared 71.8 percent of those reported cases. That is, in felonies.

And the arrests for felonies, we have that also, but you would not be concerned with that, because the clearance percentage gives you the base.

The arrests for misdemeanors in the fiscal year 1936 were 56,243 and the urests in 1946 were 70,238.

Now, arrests for violation of municipal regulations in the fiscal year, including traffic, in 1936 were 69,447, and in 1946 there were 109,938 arrests.

Mr. Bates. I notice by some statistics that we have here from the Bureau of the Census comparing the costs that the cost of maintenance of our correctional institutions on a per-capita basis, I believe, shows that the figures are far in excess of other communities.

Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.
Mr. BATES. That may be due to the police work.
Mr. THOMAS. Well, that could be the case, sir.

Recently, there was the crime of the Kelly murder. The men worked on that case day and night. Some of the plain-clothes men and even those in uniform worked long hours. They knew no limit to hours. They possibly worked a couple of days without sleep or rest. The commanding officer gave them some time off for that time. They did not give up until the case was closed.

Mr. BATEs. I notice in this figure that we have for 1945 of these 14 cities, out of the distribution of moneys for over-all municipal expenditures, that the average is 2 percent for corrections in these other 13 cities, and it is 3.9 percent, nearly double, for the District of Columbia.

Mr. THOMAS. Yes, sir.

Mr. Bates. In other words, for every $2 that these other districts gave, on an average for correction, they give $4 in the District. So you must have a pretty heavy penal population here.

Mr. Thomas. As it will indicate, concerning the statistics just given on the arrests, and so on, that is important.

There is a quotation that occurred in the newspaper which if you would care to have me give, I would like to, just as a slight thing, which might border on the revenue.

The report was submitted to the Attorney General from the chief judge of the Municipal Court of the District of Columbia, and it is stated in this newspaper report, if this can be called authentic, that fines, fees, and forfeitures amounted to $756,543. This was compared with $491,406 for the similar period of the previous year, an increase of 51 percent.

The court's outlay and expenses, its budget, was $406,225 for the present fiscal year, so that the cash income of the court for a half year was about double the cost for the entire fiscal year.

« PreviousContinue »