The Pictorial Field-book of the Revolution ; Or, Illustrations, by Pen and Pencil, of the History, Biography, Scenery, Relics, and Traditions of the War for Independence, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Lady Ackland proceeding to the American Camp 32 Initial Letter
69
Schuylers Mill Saratog 34 Schauylers Mansion
74
General Gatess Hea
75
of the two CampsExposed Condition of the British Camp
77
Facsimile of the Signatures of Burgoyne and Gates
79
View of the Place where the British laid down their Arms
80
Site of the first Interview between Gates and Bur goyne
81
Medal struck in Honor of General Gates and his Army
83
Portrait of Silas Deane
85
CHAPTER IV
88
The Riedesel House Saratoga
89
General Schuyler and Baroness R
91
Place where Lovelace was executed
92
Bloody Run
94
Fort Edward
95
Diagram illustrating a Fortification
96
Jane MCrea Tree Fort Edward
97
A River Bateau
98
Colonel Cochrans Monument
102
A curious Skull
103
Ride from Fort Edward to Glenns FallsAppearance of
104
View below Glenns Falls
105
Williamss Rock
106
Portrait of King Hendrick 64 Bloody Pond
107
Fort William Henry
108
Ruins of the Cº
112
Head of Lake George
113
Long Point and Vicinity
114
Sabbath Day Point
115
Rogerss Rock
116
Ground Plan of Fort Ticonderoga
118
Ticonderoga and its AssociationsVisit to the Ruins of
121
Portrait of Isaac Rice
122
Ruins at Ticonderoga
127
The Bakery
128
Mount Independence Ticonderoga the Lake and
131
Portrait of General St Clair
132
Site of Fort Anne
139
Major Israel Putnam in British Uniform
140
Battleground near Fort Anne
141
View at Putnams Rock
142
Conſtance re from WhitehallSholess Landing
145
4 Plan of the Battle
146
Headstone Mount Indepe
148
View from Sholess Landing Page
149
Initial Letter 70
151
Crown Point
152
Well at Crown Po
153
tons Attempt to seduce the Bishop of QuebecConsistency
158
159 94 Burgoyne addressing the Indians
160
Tomb of Ethan Allen
161
Scene of Arnolds Naval Battle
162
Plan of Arnolds first Engagement
163
Plan of Arnolds second Engagement
164
Washingtons Hairpowder Pouch
166
Isle Aux Noix in the Sored
167
Military Establishment at St Johns
169
Carleton at LongueuilSurrender of St JohnsThe Spoils
171
St Johns on the Richelieu River
172
Portrait of Lord George Germain 17 3
173
Canadian Peasant Girl
174
Portrait of Francois Yest
175
A CalecheAurora Bo
176
MontrealA Ride to the MountainInteresting ViewVisit
177
Grey Nun Praying 378
178
View of Montreal and its Walls in 1760
179
Signature of Ethan Allen
180
Portrait of Sir Guy Carleton
184
CityEarly Settlement and GrowthFrench Operations
185
Wolfes Ravine
187
Portrait of General Wolfe
188
Wolfes Monument
189
Norridgewock Falls 1775
191
Arnolds Route through the Wilderness 1775
193
Joined by IndiansArrival at Point LeviIncidents of
194
Cedars Rapids at St Timothy
207
Lumber Raft on the St Lawrence
209
Sheldon House
210
Windmill Point
211
of the PatriotsThe OswegatchieOld French Fort
212
Portrait and Signature of Lord Amherst
213
Initial Letter
214
Oswego in 1755
217
Remains of New Fort Oswego
218
Distant View of Fort Niaga
225
Niagara Suspension Bridge
228
Sepulchral Stone
230
Site of Fort Stanwix
231
Portrait of Sir William Johnson
232
Caughnawaga Church
233
Guy Park
234
Initial Letter
240
Order of March of St Legers Forces 24l 161 Portrait of Colonel Marinus Willett
244
Battleground of Oriskany
245
Bowl of a Pipe
246
Fort Schuyler and Vicinity
251
Old Stone Church German Flats
254
Portrait of Joseph Brant
256
General Herkimers Residence
260
chapter xii
264
Armed Settlers
266
Portrait of General Sullivan
272
CHAPTER xiii
284
The Kane House
286
his WivesThe Dutch GirlMolly BrantSir William John
288
Portrait House and Signature of J Dievendorf
293
dorffIndian Method of ScalpingAttack on Currytown
294
ture of MDonaldLuthers HymnDeath of Shell
300
Portrait of Hendrick Hudson
301
Washingtons Headquarters at Morristown
309
Schuylers Headquarters at Morristown
315
Form of the BillsDevices and MottoesPaul Revere
317
20
322
Old Tavern at Elizabethport
328
Washingtons Rock
334
Portrait of Count Zinzendorf
342
Site of Wintermoots Fort
351
Queen Esthers Rock
357
Initial Letter
364
Timoth Pickering
374
View from the Shawangunk Mountains
381
The Constitution House Kingston
387
Portrait of General Stark
394
ing in the RainThe Hessian EncampmentA bellicose
396
Initial Letter
401
the ExpeditionRising of the MilitiaCharacter of the People
402
Expedition under TryonLanding of British Troops near
423
Colonel HumphreysHis MonumentThe Grave of
430
Portait of Dr Eneas Munson
433
The Connecticut CharterRide to WethersfieldArrival
439
The old Colony Seal
445
Prowess of Colonial TroopsThe French and Indian
452
Usual Appearance of King George III 1776
458
Portrait of Colonel Barré 4tº
466
Portrait of William Pitt
472
waiterSeizure of the of
479
Initial Letter
485
of the Spiritof LibertyBrief ReviewAltern
490
Signature of James Otis
492
Portrait of David Kinnison
499
Hancocks House Boston
507
BillRecall of HutchinsonDivision of SentinentQuebec
508
Signature of the Baroness Riedesel
523
The moral Spectacle in the ColoniesCarrying
524
The New England Flag
541
Portrait of Joseph Warren
548
triotismMasonic Honors to his MemoryThe old Monu
551
Chantreys Statue of Washington
561
the several DivisionsOfficers of the sameGeneral Joseph
566

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 84 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never — never — never.
Page 438 - Faith, etc., having undertaken for the glory of God, and advancement of the Christian faith, and honor of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia, do, by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and of one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic...
Page 518 - I trust it is obvious to your lordships that all attempts to impose servitude upon such men, to establish despotism over such a mighty continental nation must be vain, must be fatal. We shall be forced ultimately to retract; let us retract while we can, not when we must.
Page 84 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Page 563 - MR. PRESIDENT: Though I am truly sensible of the high honor done me, in this appointment, yet I feel great distress, from a consciousness that my abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important trust.
Page 227 - And what are we, That hear the question of that voice sublime? Oh, what are all the notes that ever rung From war's vain trumpet, by thy thundering side ? Yea, what is all the riot man can make In his short life, to thy unceasing roar? And yet, bold babbler, what art thou to Him Who drowned a world, and heaped the waters far Above its loftiest mountains ? — a light wave, That breaks, and whispers of its Maker's might.
Page 462 - They planted by your care! No! your oppressions planted them in America. — They fled from your tyranny to a then uncultivated and...
Page xxi - Man was in ancient days of grosser mould, And Hercules might blush to learn how far Beyond the limits he had vainly set, The dullest seaboat soon shall wing her way. Men shall descry another hemisphere, Since to one common centre all things tend ; So earth, by curious mystery divine Well balanced, hangs amid the starry spheres. At our antipodes are cities, states, And thronged empires, ne'er divined of yore. But see, the sun speeds on his western path To glad the nations with expected light.
Page 87 - Neither of the two parties shall conclude either truce or peace with Great Britain, without the formal consent of the other first obtained ; and they mutually engage not to lay down their arms until the independence of the United States shall have been formally, or tacitly, assured by the treaty or treaties, that shall terminate the war.
Page 555 - Ere the evening lamps are lighted, And, like phantoms grim and tall, Shadows from the fitful fire-light Dance upon the parlor wall; Then the forms of the departed Enter at the open door; The beloved, the true-hearted, Come to visit me once more...

Bibliographic information