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" I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, O what black hours we have spent This night! what sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! And more must, in yet longer light's delay. "
Secreted Desires: The Major Uranians - Hopkins, Pater and Wilde - Page 123
by Michael Matthew Kaylor - 2006 - 457 pages
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Myth and Reality in Irish Literature

Joseph Ronsley - Literary Collections - 1977 - 329 pages
...make-believe. And here is Hopkins, in a sonnet probably written the same year Miss Tynan's poem was published: I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours,...night! what sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! And you must, in yet longer light's delay. 42 Hopkins, Further Letters, p. 431; and Irish Monthly, 31,...
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Valuation in Criticism and Other Essays

Leavis F R, F. R. Leavis - Literary Criticism - 1986 - 309 pages
...to affirm. I think it was a kind of complexity that in his type is very common. I'll read this one: I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, O what black hours have we spent This night! what sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! And more must, in yet longer...
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Shakespeare's Metrical Art

George T. Wright - Poetry - 1988 - 363 pages
...Hopkins will arrange the sentence and verse to throw especially strong emphasis on nouns or verbs: With witness I speak this. But where I say Hours I mean years, mean life. And my lament (69:5-6) Oh, the sots and thralls of lust Do in spare hours more thrive than I that spend, Sir, life...
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Victorian Subjects

Joseph Hillis Miller - Literary Criticism - 1991 - 330 pages
...succession of empty moments, each one of which, because of its emptiness, seems itself to be lifelong: What hours, O what black hours we have spent This...speak this. But where I say Hours I mean years, mean life.26 In this extremity, any possibility of help will be grasped. Perhaps that non-human world of...
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The Wordsworth Book of Sonnets

Linda Marsh, Masson - Poetry - 1995 - 195 pages
...thoughts that please me less, and less betray me. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE I wake and feel the fell of dark I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours,...light's delay With witness I speak this. But where 1 say Hours I mean years, mean life. And my lament Is cries countless, cries like dead letters sent...
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"God's Grandeur" and Other Poems

Gerard Manley Hopkins - Poetry - 1995 - 54 pages
...ban Bars or hell's spell thwarts. This to hoard unheard, Heard unheeded, leaves me a lonely began. 45 I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours,...in yet longer light's delay. With witness I speak mis. But where I say Hours I mean years, mean life. And my lament Is cries countless, cries like dead...
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The Third and Only Way: Reflections on Staying Alive

Helen Smith Bevington - Biography & Autobiography - 1996 - 209 pages
...wrote the six terrible sonnets, poems of desolation, panic at God's wrath and the loss of the light: "I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day, / What...hours, O what black hours we have spent / This night!" A night that was eternity. "No worst," he said, "there is none." Wallace Stevens, too, saw the light...
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Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...Difference i' th' Dark," Hesperides (1 648). repr. in The Poems of Robert Herrick, ed. LC Martin (1956). 2 I wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, O what black hours we have spent This night! GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS, (1844-1889) British poet, Jesuit priest. "I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark,"...
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A Queer Chivalry: The Homoerotic Asceticism of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Julia F. Saville - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 240 pages
...we been? What have we seen, my mind?" (1. 1) — and the sonnet "I wake and feel the fell of dark": "What hours, O what black hours we have spent / This...night! what sights you, heart, saw, ways you went!" (11. 2-3). Similarly, compare these lines from Caradoc's soliloquy — "What do? Not yield, / Not hope,...
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The Poem as Sacrament: The Theological Aesthetic of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Philip A. Ballinger - Religion - 2000 - 260 pages
...strangers, "a lonely began," gall and heartburn. His sense of desolation found expression in a poem : I Wake and feel the fell of dark, not day. What hours, 0 what black hours we have spent This night! what sights you, heart, saw; ways you went! And more must,...
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