Pioneering in Central Africa

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Presbyterian Committee of Publication, 1903 - Africa, Central - 500 pages
 

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Page 109 - Now it is not good for the Christian's health to hustle the Aryan brown, For the Christian riles and the Aryan smiles and he weareth the Christian down ; And the end of the fight is a tombstone white with the name of the late deceased, And the epitaph drear : "A fool lies here who tried to hustle the East.
Page 397 - Merciful Heaven, Thou rather with thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st the unwedgeable and gnarled oak Than the soft myrtle: but man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven As make the angels weep; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.
Page 422 - My good blade carves the casques of men, My tough lance thrusteth sure, My strength is as the strength of ten, Because my heart is pure.
Page 338 - IN the far North stands a Pine-tree, lone, Upon a wintry height ; It sleeps : around it snows have thrown A covering of white. It dreams forever of a Palm That, far i' the Morning-land, Stands silent in a most sad calm Midst of the burning sand.
Page 397 - But man, proud man ! Dressed in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence, — like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven, As make the angels weep; who, with our spleens, Would all themselves laugh mortal.
Page 294 - Atlanta University Leaflet No. 19. done by them, and their skill amazes me. They have the art of tempering copper as well as of making soft steel. Some of the objects of their craft which I placed in the National Museum at Washington are revelations to the uninitiated in their remarkable complexity and variety. Mr. Vemer's mission station was in the Congo Free State, on the upper courses of the Kasai, in the heart of savage Africa, where the people have never been touched by the influences of either...
Page 128 - ... mode. In many regions the pieces used for it are cowrie shells ground down from above and below; we found such pieces in use at Ikoko, among Ntumba, where the following values of throws were given to us: 4:0, best; 2:2, good; 3:1, bad. It may be this game which Verner found among the Baluba. " . . a circle of gamesters seated on the ground ; a few seashells would be tossed into the air and the point of the game depended on how they fell, each player taking his toss-up in turn. In this way men...
Page 270 - Pygmies' sense of smell is as keen as that of their dogs. They are such shots with the bow that I have seen one send an arrow through a rat at twenty yards, while it was running through the village. The Bantu would spear fish as they leaped from the water, or darted among the rocks in the streams. As might be expected, the chief characteristic of the Pygmy's mind is cunning. Ages of warfare with ferocious beasts, and long periods of struggling against tribes of men physically superior to them, have...
Page 350 - ... however, who was able or willing to see any connection between the potential of black Africans and that of black Americans. One who did, Samuel Verner, early in his career suggested that he was trying to repay blacks for wrongs suffered in the United States. Verner noted the irony of mission work: These Luebo people had become as civilized and more Christianized than the colored people of my own Columbia in five years
Page 137 - It was a matter of gratification that the international prohibition of the importation and sale of intoxicating liquors in the Central African Zone was so effectively executed. There was, therefore almost no drunkenness at all among the natives. The sap of the oil palm which...

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