Essays on the Evolution of the Post-Apartheid State: Legacies, Reforms and Prospects

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Real African Publishers, Oct 1, 2014 - Social Science - 344 pages
This book critically examines the challenges, successes, and failures of the post-1994 South African state against the humane values enshrined in its constitution: nonracial democracy and respect for all generations of human rights—civil, political, social, economic, resources and the environment and gender and communication. The book sheds light on the difficulties faced by the State when trying to bring together a diverse society comprised of traditional South African, Western-based and "other" African (immigrant) cultures into a cohesive nation with a common South African identity. The views of the essays may not be entirely consistent and the issues they raise may be contentious. This merely affirms the truism that the State is a contested terrain. The aim of this book is to deepen the search for an understanding of the theory of the State as it applies to a transforming society such as ours and to trudge the dividing line between theory and practice so they can feed into each other in a progressive spiral towards the desired end-state.
 

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Contents

Foreword
6
Contributors
8
Acknowledgements
10
Introduction Mcebisi Ndletyana and David Maimela
12
Abbreviations
19
From an Instrument of Terror to a Legitimate Modern Policing Agency Themba Shabangu
23
A Communitys Police? Vanessa Barolsky
61
The Simulacrum of Equality? Engendering the Post94 South African State Lisa Vetten
121
Municipal Mis Use? Robert Cameron
165
Political Administrative Interface and the Capacity of the State Mashupye Maserumule
197
The Case of South Africa Ralph Mathekga
251
A Critical Appraisal Thami Mazwai
269
Challenges and Opportunities Oupa Makhalemele
299
Index
333
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Mcebisi Ndletyana held research positions at various research institutions including the Human Sciences Research Council in Pretoria, the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS) at Doornfontein, and at the Steve Biko Foundation in Braamfontein before joining MISTRA. He has also held lecturing positions at the Marymount Manhattan College in New York as well as at the City University of New York's Hunter College.

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