Crime and Policing in Post-apartheid South Africa: Transforming Under Fire

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Indiana University Press, 2002 - History - 169 pages

"[A] cogent and well-informed discussion of the South African Police Service and the organisational problems it faces." -- Stephen Ellis

Since the mid-1990s, South Africa has experienced a crime wave of such unprecedented proportions that the ability of the new democracy to form a stable civil society and govern effectively has been called into question. In this timely book, Mark Shaw describes how a police force that was so effective under apartheid became so ineffectual in the face of rising crime. He shows how an increase in violent crime shapes society, police, and government, and discusses possible solutions for the current crisis. International crimes such as war, terrorism, and organized crime are explored along with crimes that affect individual security, such as armed robbery, murder, and rape. Crime and Policing in Post-Apartheid South Africa draws attention to both the national and the international dimensions of crime in this society in transition.

 

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Contents

A criminal state
1
The crime of apartheid
2
Youth and crime
6
Apartheid as crime prevention
10
Crime and the decline of apartheid
15
The politics of police prevention
22
Negotiating a new police
25
Legitimacy first all else will follow
28
Public reactions to insecurity
83
A battle of perceptions
85
Divided by fear
91
Ourselves alone?
95
The impact of private policing
102
The security boom
104
A contracted divide
110
A new reality?
115

Partners in crime
34
New issue new agenda?
37
Confronting the violent society
42
Counting the cost
43
Unequal victimisation
50
Comparisons and characteristics
52
A nation in need of healing
58
The rise of organised crime
63
Connections and continuities
66
New democracy unsafe neighbourhood
69
Conflict and crime
72
New and stronger players
75
A criminal future?
79
Assessing state responses
119
Local policing and accountability
120
Paper promises?
126
The new police
131
Judging success
136
Conclusion options and prospects
141
Towards democratic policing
143
Designing a new safety system
147
Undercutting crime and its causes
151
Crime and democracy
155
Bibliography
159
Index
165
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Mark Shaw is a research fellow in the Department of Political Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, and former director of President Mandela's special government unit on crime and justice.

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