Communication as ...: Perspectives on Theory

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Gregory J. Shepherd, Jeffrey St. John
SAGE, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 276 pages
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Communication As... is a collection of 27 essays by leading thinkers in the field of communication theory. Each author in the volume has chosen a particular stance on communication and forwarded it as a primary or essential way of viewing communication with decided benefits over other views. The chapters in the book are brief, argumentative, and forceful; together they explore the wide range of theorizing about communication, cutting across all lines of traditional divisions in the field.
 

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This book is a VERY hard read for anyone not used to the esoteric language. I highly recommend taking your time reading each chapter. Sadly, I did not have that opportunity. With each chapter being written by a different author from a new perspective, it causes you to have to research each idea and author to understand what they are prosing on about. Additionally, it feels as it vocabulary choices were made simply to sound academic and be difficult for the average reader. This tome is certainly not aimed at an average college student but rather to the highly educated, communication focused individual. Don't feel bad or stupid if you must have a dictionary nearby to define terms (beginning at the preface).
It certainly feels that it is not written to be understood or lauded as a life-changing or communication-changing book.
 

Contents

Relationality
3
Ritual
13
Transcendence
22
Constructive
31
A Practice
38
Collective Memory
51
Vision
60
Embodiment
67
Storytelling
123
Structuring
143
Political Participation 155
159
Diffusion
174
Rational Argument
187
Dissemination
211
Articulation
223
Communicability
242

Raced
75
Social Identity
84
Dialogue
101

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About the author (2006)

Gregory J. Shepherd (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is Professor and Dean of the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University. His primary scholarly interests are in communication theory and American pragmatism. He is a winner of the Central States Communication Association Outstanding Young Teacher Award, as well as a W. T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence. He is co-editor (with Eric Rothenbuhler) of Communication and Community (2001, LEA), and in addition to chapters in various edited volumes, his work has appeared in Communication Monographs, Human Communication Research, Journal of Communication, Communication Yearbook, Communication Studies, Southern Journal of Communication, Communication Research, Journal of Social Psychology, Management Communication Quarterly, Journal of Research and Development in Education, and other scholarly publications.

Jeffrey St. John (Ph.D., University of Washington) is Assistant Professor in the School of Communication Studies at Ohio University. His published work includes essays on legal argument, critical rhetoric, the construction of self at sites of public controversy, and the reception of contested terms— including "tolerance" and "civility"— in public culture. He teaches undergraduate courses in public advocacy, free speech, communication theory, and political rhetoric, and graduate courses in communication theory and public deliberation. His current research projects include a mapping of the rhetorical geography of "moral values" voting patterns (with his colleague Jerry Miller) and a study of mimesis and public memory in contemporary fiction.

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