Caress and Conquer

Front Cover
Love Spell Books, 1999 - Fiction - 480 pages
1 Review
In the 1700s, poverty-stricken Amanda Person, an indentured servant transported to Charles Town, South Carolina, finds her master to be the very man who caused her terrible problems and whose love for her still burns fiercely. Original.

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LOVE CONNIE MASON

User Review  - leannef7211 - Overstock.com

Connie Mason books are great they are on the edge of your seat and full of romance. She always gets right to the romance in her books not have some long drawn out begining then get to the good stuff. She knows how to please her readers!!! Read full review

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well, in a way this story was okay and i felt sad for her at the part where her breast milk dried up and she couldn't feed her baby and she was very sick at times. but i was mostly angered by how she is so stupid!!!! i mean STUPID!!! all together she gets the following treatment:raped by male protagonist (although i believed she liked it for her first time), jailed and bargains her body to the constable, gets raped again by male protaganist, gets pregnant, flogged by jealous mistress, accused of adultery, used as a sex slave, mistreated by male protagonist, raped by indians, and well, it's just SICK!!!!
as for the male protagonist, i hate him too!!!! too stupid and a real jerk. if i were in this story, i wouldn't even spend my time on this jerk!!! also i would kill myself if i were in the female protagonist part.
 

About the author (1999)

Connie Mason was first published in 1984, and before that she was a full time home maker. Writing had always been one of her dreams. Mason was named Story Teller of the Year in 1990 by Romantic Times and was awarded the Career Achievement award in the Western category by Romantic Times in 1994. In 1995, she was featured on a segment of the CBS news show 48 Hours, which devoted an entire program to the romance novel industry. She was also featured in an article published by National Inquirer.

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