Black Sheep: A Novel, Volume 1

Front Cover
Tinslsey brothers, 1867
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 6 - ... a small tree which was carefully protected with a large piece of matting, and which flanked one end of the balustrade, he quietly removed the matting, and, wrapping it round him, returned to his position, watching and commenting on the scene of which he was a spectator. It was an old room on which George Dallas looked — an old room with panelled walls, surmounted by a curious carved frieze and stuccoed roof, and hung round with family portraits, which gave it a certain grim and stern air, and...
Page 86 - George, the bitterness is succeeding the honey in your mouth ; you are ' giving your strength for that which is not meat, and your labour for that which satisfieth not...
Page 7 - Where is my mother?" he thought. "Good Heaven ! if she did but know that I am shivering here." The strains of sweet clear music reached his ears, floods of light streamed out from the ballroom, a throng of dancers whirled past the window, he saw the soft fluttering dresses, he heard the rustle of the robes, the sounds of the gay voices, and the ring of laughter, and ever and anon, as a stray couple fell away from the dance, and lingered near the window, a fair young face would meet his gaze, and...
Page 100 - ... past her and made one stride into the middle of the room, where he stood looking round him with a suspicious leer. He was a young man, apparently not more than two or three-and-twenty, judging by his figure and his light, active movements ; but cunning and deceit had stamped such wrinkles round his eyes, and graven such lines round his mouth, as are seldom to Be seen in youth. His eyes, of a greenish-gray hue, were small and deeply sunk in his head ; his cheekbones were high, his cheeks fringed...
Page 100 - ... tuft of hair growing underneath his chin. His figure was tall and angular, his arms and legs long and awkward, his hands and feet large and ill-shaped. He wore a large thick overcoat with broad fur collar and cuffs, and a hood (also fur-lined) hanging back on his shoulders. With the exception of a very slight strip of ribbon, he had no cravat underneath his long limp turnover collar, but stuck into his shirtfront was a large and handsome diamond pin.
Page 85 - I have not said again and again, and with sadly little effect, as you will not deny ? But I forbear, and I hope. A feeling that I cannot define, an instinct, tells me that a crisis in my life is near. And what can such a crisis in my life mean, except in reference to you, my beloved and only child ? In your hands lies all...
Page 42 - ... wheels revolved amid mud-ruts, and every passing cabhorse produced a fountain of slush and spray. But it was even worse in the by-streets, where an attempt at sweeping had been made, where the mud lay in a thick slimy, shiny tide between the narrow ridges of footpath, where the tall houses, so close together that they completely filtered the air and light and retained nothing but the darkness and the dirt, were splashed with mud to their first-floor windows, and whose inhabitants or...
Page 54 - ... side in two long curls, and gathered into a clump at the back of her head, with an impertinent nose only just redeemed from being a snub, with a small mouth, and a very provoking pattable chin. See how she steals behind her husband, her dark...

Bibliographic information