Authentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment

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Simon and Schuster, Oct 2, 2002 - Psychology - 336 pages
A national bestseller, Authentic Happiness launched the revolutionary new science of Positive Psychology—and sparked a coast-to-coast debate on the nature of real happiness.

According to esteemed psychologist and bestselling author Martin Seligman, happiness is not the result of good genes or luck. Real, lasting happiness comes from focusing on one’s personal strengths rather than weaknesses—and working with them to improve all aspects of one’s life. Using practical exercises, brief tests, and a dynamic website program, Seligman shows readers how to identify their highest virtues and use them in ways they haven’t yet considered. Accessible and proven, Authentic Happiness is the most powerful work of popular psychology in years.

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User Review  - greeniezona - LibraryThing

I'd known about Seligmman's work for quite some time. I first started taking questionnaires at his website back in 2008. The fact that three years later, I still haven't taken them all, should be a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AshRyan - LibraryThing

An Aristotelian approach to psychology The basic idea behind positive psychology is that, rather than solely treating mental disease and alleviating negative symptoms, the field of psychology should ... Read full review

Contents

3
30
4
45
5
62
6
83
7
102
8
125
10
165
11
185
POSITIVE EMOTION
265
Positive Feeling and Positive Character
272
Can You Make Yourself Lastingly Happier?
279
Optimism about the Future
288
IN THE MANSIONS OF LIFE
296
Reprise and Summary
303
45
310
247
318

12
208
13
247

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Page 122 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 136 - In the various enumerations of the moral virtues I had met with in my reading, I found the catalogue more or less numerous, as different writers included more or fewer ideas under the same name.
Page 59 - And all shall be well and All manner of thing shall be well When the tongues of flame are in-folded Into the crowned knot of fire And the fire and the rose are one.
Page 59 - He said not: Thou shalt not be tempested, thou shalt not be travailed, thou shalt not be afflicted; but He said : Thou shalt not be overcome.
Page 62 - In most ways my life is close to my ideal The conditions of my life are excellent I am satisfied with my life So far I have gotten the important things I want in life If I could live my life over, I would change almost nothing...
Page 201 - It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words, "And this, too, shall pass away.
Page 108 - The stone grows old. Eternity Is not for stones. But I shall go down from this airy space, this swift white peace, this stinging exultation ; And time will dose about me, and my soul stir to the rhythm of the daily round.
Page 32 - This scale consists of a number of words that describe different feelings and emotions. Read each item and then mark the appropriate answer in the space next to that word. Indicate to what extent you have felt this way during the past few davs.

About the author (2002)

Martin E. P. Seligman is the Robert A. Fox Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. His visionary work in Positive Psychology has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Science Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation.

Bibliographic information