SAS Survival Analysis Techniques for Medical Research

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SAS Institute, Jan 1, 2003 - Computers - 249 pages
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If you are new to survival analysis or want to expand your capabilities in this area, you'll benefit from Alan Cantor's follow-up to Extending SAS Survival Analysis Techniques for Medical Research. This second edition presents the theory and methods of survival analysis along with excellent discussions of the SAS procedures used to implement the methods described. New features include a discussion of permutation and randomization tests; a discussion of the use of data imputation; an expanded discussion of power for Cox regression; descriptions of the new features of SAS 9, such as confidence bands for the Kaplan-Meier curve; appendixes that cover mathematical and statistical background topics needed in survival analysis; and student exercises. The new features, along with several useful macros and numerous examples, make this a suitable textbook for a course in survival analysis for biostatistics majors and majors in related fields. This book excels at presenting complex ideas in a way that enables those without a strong technical background to understand and apply the concepts and techniques.
  

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Contents

Chapter 2 Nonparametric Survival Function Estimation
17
Chapter 3 Nonparametric Comparison of Survival Distributions
53
Chapter 4 Proportional Hazards Regression
111
Chapter 5 Parametric Methods
153
Appendix A Mathematical Concepts
187
Appendix B Statistical Concepts
193
Appendix C SAS Concepts
209
References
219
Index
223
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About the author (2003)

A member of the Biostatistics Core at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Alan B. Cantor earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics and had an additional two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Biostatistics. A SAS user since 1980, his experience includes extensive use of base SAS, SAS/STAT, the IML procedure, and SAS/GRAPH software. Cantor's work has been published in several prestigious medical journals and in noted scientific and statistical publications such as the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Controlled Clinical Trials, and Statistics in Medicine. Cantor continues to teach, write about, and study the methods of survival analysis research.

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