The Sorcerer's Apprentice: Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper

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University of Chicago Press, Sep 25, 2001 - Art - 318 pages
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The Sorcerer's Apprentice is John Richardson's vivid memoir of the time he spent living with and learning from the deeply knowledgeable and temperamental art collector, Douglas Cooper. For ten years the two entertained a circle of friends that included Jean Cocteau, W. H. Auden, Tennessee Williams, and, most intriguingly, Pablo Picasso. Compulsively readable and beautifully illustrated, this book is both a triple portrait of the author, Cooper, and Picasso, and a revealing look at a crucial artistic period.

Originally published by Knopf
1999 ISBN: 0-375-40033-8
  

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The sorcerer's apprentice: Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In this remarkably candid memoir, the author of the ongoing, acclaimed A Life of Picasso recounts his own life with Douglas Cooper, his mentor in post-World War II France. Richardson was a young man ... Read full review

Review: The Sorcerer's Apprentice: Picasso, Provence, and Douglas Cooper

User Review  - Liz - Goodreads

Very amusing...as long as one never had to actually deal with Douglas Cooper. Read full review

Contents

Army and Navy Child
3
Douglas Cooper
19
First Night
43
Grand Tour
55
Back on the Road
71
The Revelation of Castille
87
Miscreants Pets and Neighbors
105
A Trip with Picasso
125
Painters and Paintings
181
Picasso and Dora
203
Collectors
223
Picasso and Jacqueline
233
The Sorcerers Apprentice
251
The Beginning of the End
263
The End
281
Epilogue
297

The Visitors Book
139
Graham Sutherland and the Tate Affair
157
God Save the Queen
171
Select Bibliography
305
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

John Richardson is the author of two volumes of A Life of Picasso, the first of which won the 1991 Whitbread Book of the Year Award. He is a contributor to the New York Review of Books and Vanity Fair.

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