Art in Renaissance Italy

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Laurence King Publishing, 2005 - Art, Italian - 576 pages
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"Art mattered in the Renaissance... People expected painting, sculpture, architecture, and other forms of visual art to have a meaningful effect on their lives, " write the authors of this important new look at Italian Renaissance art. A glance at the pages of Art in Renaissance Italy shows at once its freshness and breadth of approach, which includes thorough explanation into how and why works of art, buildings, prints, and other kinds of art came to be. This book discusses how men and women of the Renissance regarded art and artists as well as why works of Renaissance art look the way they do, and what this means to us. It covers not only Florence and Rome, but also Venice and the Veneto, Assisi, Siena, Milan, Pavia, Padua, Mantua, Verona, Ferrara, Urbino, and Naples -- each governed in a distinctly different manner, every one with its own political and social structures that inevitably affected artistic styles. Spanning more than three centuries, the narrative brings to life the rich tapestry of Italian Renaissance society and the art works that are its enduring legacy.
  

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Art in Renaissance Italy

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This fine work by Paoletti and Radke (art history, Wesleyan Univ. and Syracuse Univ., respectively) is wide in scope, covering the years from 1300 to the late 1500s, and purposely opens discussion to ... Read full review

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what was important about renaissance?

Contents

Preface
10
Patronage
16
Materials and Methods
22
Renovations and Restorations
37
Fashioning the Female Artist
43
Francis as Another Christ
50
Artists Popes and Cardinals
56
Narrative Realism
67
Power
309
The Palazzo Foscari
315
The Cappella Nova in the late 1440s
321
Painting
327
Commemorative State Commissions
333
Art and Punishment
339
Moro and a Grand Classical Style
367
The First Half of
377

Traditions and Innovations
77
The Cathedral Complex
94
The Cathedral
100
Sienas Political System and Civic Art
120
St Marks Basilica
138
The Church of Santi Giovanni e Paolo
145
Morality and Judgment
152
The Bridge of Salvation
163
Visconti Milan and Carrara Padua
174
The Cansignorio della Scala Monument in Verona
182
Giangaleazzo Visconti
189
North Italian Influences in Naples
199
Ghiherti versus Brunelleschi
207
The Foundling Hospital
217
Art and Childbirth
219
The Trinity and SinglePoint Perspective
231
Sculptural Commissions Outside Florence
239
The Gates of Paradise
246
A Job Application
257
Donatello in Padua
264
The Golden Age and Lorenzo the Magnificent
271
Portraiture
278
Art and the Collector
285
Ruins and Dreams
293
Paul II
299
c
399
Michelangelo the Poet
403
Roman Civic Imagery
410
Papal Luxury
416
Raphael and Michelangelo
422
The Loves of Jupiter
428
Mannerism and the Medici
437
Altarpieces
444
Florence under Cosimo I
452
Casting the Perseus
459
Vision and Monumentality
464
Energized Altarpieces
470
Titian in Urbino
477
Colorito versus Disegno
484
Patronage of Commercial and Ecclesiastical
490
IV
499
A Word of Advice
505
The Demands of the Council
513
Women as Patrons
523
Milanese Architecture
529
StillLife Painting
535
Art Pilgrimage
543
List of Popes
553
Literary Credits Picture Credits
566
Copyright

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References to this book

Die Sforza, Volume 2
Maike Vogt-Lüerssen
No preview available - 2008
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About the author (2005)

John T. Paoletti is professor of art history at Wesleyan University. He is the co-author of Art in Renaissance Italy, now in its third edition, and is completing a book on Michelangelo's David. He is a former editor of The Art Bulletin and has held a membership at the Institute for Advanced Study.

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