Horace: Satires, Book 1

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 12, 2012 - History - 370 pages
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Horace's first book of Satires is his debut work, a document of one man's self-fashioning on the cusp between Republic and Empire and a pivotal text in the history of Roman satire. It wrestles with the problem of how to define and assimilate satire and justifies the poet's own position in a suspicious society. The commentary gives full weight to the dense texture of these poems while helping readers interpret their most cryptic aspects and appreciate their technical finesse. The introduction puts Horace in context as late-Republican newcomer and a vital figure in the development of satire and discusses the structure and meaning of Satires I, literary and philosophical influences, style, metre, transmission and Horace's rich afterlife. Each poem is followed by an essay offering overall interpretation. This work is designed for upper-level students and scholars of classics but contains much of interest to specialists in later European literature.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Q Horati Flacci sermonvm liber primvs
31
Commentary
58

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About the author (2012)

Horace is one of the most noted poets and satirists of Ancient times. Born Quintus Horatius Flaccus, to a former slave in 65 B.C., Horace was taken to Rome and Athens to be educated. He joined Brutus's army after the assassination of Julius Caesar, and later came under favor of the emperor Octavian. Horace used his observations of politics to great advantage in his works. Horace is chiefly remembered for his four books of Odes. Technically and lyrically stunning, they contain word organization and imagery that is employed masterfully. He is also noted for the brilliant satires that brought him to the attention of the poet Virgil. Virgil introduce him to Maecenas, a wealthy patron, who would help Horace throughout his life. Horace earned a great reputation during his lifetime and was an example to many later generations of poets. Horace died in 8 B.C., a few months after his friend and patron Maecenas.

E. J. Gowers is Senior Lecturer in Classics, University of Cambridge and Fellow of St John's College, Cambridge. Her first book, The Loaded Table (1993), about the representation of food in Latin literature, won the Premio Langhe Ceretto in 1994. With William Fitzgerald, she co-edited Ennius Perennis (Cambridge Classical Journal supplementary volume 31, 2007), to which she contributed a chapter and the introduction. She has written numerous articles on Roman satire and has also published widely on other aspects of Latin literature and culture, including Apuleius, Columella, Ovid, Terence, Valerius Maximus, Virgil, Roman food, trees, Sicily, the Emperor Augustus and the Cloaca Maxima. She regularly reviews books for the Times Literary Supplement and other journals.

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